Tag: US – Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site

Great Rivers & Routes Tourism Bureau Backs National Park Status For Cahokia Mounds; Riverbender

Photo credit: Riverbender studio

Great Rivers & Routes Tourism Bureau has issued a statement in support of National Park Status for Cahokia Mounds.The following is a statement from Cory Jobe, President & CEO of the Great Rivers & Routes Tourism Bureau:…

Source: Great Rivers & Routes Tourism Bureau Backs National Park Status For Cahokia Mounds

In the ancient Mississippian settlement, vast social events were the founding principle; The Frontier Post

Photo: Frontier Post

Pity the event planners tasked with managing Cahokia’s wildest parties. A thousand years ago, the Mississippian settlement – on a site near the modern US city of St Louis, Missouri – was renowned for bashes that went on for days. Throngs jostled for space on massive plazas.

Source: In the ancient Mississippian settlement, vast social events were the founding principle – The Frontier Post

The US’ lost, ancient megacity; Jen Rose Smith; BBC

In the ancient Mississippian settlement of Cahokia, vast social events – not trade or the economy – were the founding principle.

Source: The US’ lost, ancient megacity

Discover an ancient civilization without leaving Illinois: Cahokia site has reopened with its mysterious ‘mounds’ and a view of St. Louis; Jay Jones; Chicago Tribune

Cahokia Mounds is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and may become part of the National Park Service. It’s great for a short vacation in southern Illinois.

Source: Discover an ancient civilization without leaving Illinois: Cahokia site has reopened with its mysterious ‘mounds’ and a view of St. Louis

Same lineup; possession vs suppression; how does rivalry evolve with Blues’ Cup?; John Rosen; LA Kings Insider

The LA Kings face the defending champion St. Louis Blues at Enterprise Center tonight (5:00 p.m. PT / FOX Sports West / FOX Sports GO / LA Kings Audio Network). Today’s skate was optional, but because Jack Campbell remained on the ice with Nikolai Prokhorkin and Joakim Ryan, Jonathan Quick is projected to start against…

Source: Same lineup; possession vs suppression; how does rivalry evolve with Blues’ Cup? – LA Kings Insider

Bost introduces bill to make Cahokia Mounds a national park; Mandy Robertson; WSILTV

U.S. Representative Mike Bost has introduced legislation to make Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site a national park.

Source: Bost introduces bill to make Cahokia Mounds a national park

The Oldest Tourist Attraction in Every State; Kristine Hansen; Reader’s Digest

From fortresses to national parks to geological wonders—American history is packed into each U.S. state’s roster of tourist attractions.

Source: The Oldest Tourist Attraction in Every State

The Great River Road, Illinois: 10 Reasons Why You Need to Take It; Luxury Columnist

The Great River Road, Illinois meanders through 550 miles of scenic countryside and is one of the best road trips …

Source: The Great River Road, Illinois: 10 Reasons Why You Need to Take It – Luxury Columnist

Where to find remains of ancient cultures in the Midwest; Lisa Meyers McClintick; Star Tribune

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The Lost City of Cahokia; Kaushik; Amusing Planet

 

USA – Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site

A thousand years before Columbus’s men would land on the shores of America, a new city was sprouting on the floodplains of modern-day St. Louis, Missouri—one that would become, within the course of just five decades, the the largest city ever built north of Mexico. The city of Cahokia, at its peak between the 10th and 12th centuries, was spread over 16 square kilometers—puny by today’s standards, but at that time it was larger than many European cities, including London. Cahokia boasted a population between 10,000 and 20,000 people and had at least 120 monumental earthen mounds that acted as foundations for many great buildings. Today, fewer than 80 mounds survive. How and why Cahokia declined remains one of America’s great mysteries.

Cahokia was founded sometime around 600 CE by the Mississippians, a group of Native Americans who occupied much of the present-day south-eastern United States, from the Mississippi river to the shores of the Atlantic. These people didn’t have a written language, so we don’t know what they called themselves or their city.

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Beyond Chicago: 5 other Illinois cities to visit during this bicentennial year; Mary Bergin; Journal Sentinel

USA – Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site

The Land of Lincoln turns 200 years old this year, and much of the ongoing bicentennial bash happens in Chicago, home to the 21st state’s most popular tourist attractions and around 20 percent of the Illinois population.

It is easy to forget that Chicagoland’s Cook County, in area, takes up less than 2 percent of the Prairie State. Beyond that is a whole ‘nuther world with good reasons to visit. For example:

Collinsville: 375 miles from Milwaukee

The only UNESCO World Heritage Site in the Midwest is Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site, which would be much better known if constructed with stone instead of wood and dirt. It is our equivalent of Peru’s Machu Picchu.

Wall trenches, post holes and 80 mounds on 2,200 acres remain as evidence of the American Indian settlement, which mysteriously vanished in the 14th century. Most imposing is 100-foot-tall Monks Mound, which took 300 years to build. No prehistoric earthwork in the Americas is bigger.

Population of the farming community peaked at 20,000. Walk the grounds, take a guided tour and learn more at the interpretive center.

Read more from source: Beyond Chicago: 5 other Illinois cities to visit during this bicentennial year

How White Settlers Buried the Truth About the Midwest’s Mysterious Mounds; Sarah E Baires; Zócalo Public Square

USA – Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site

Pioneers and Early Archeologists Preferred to Credit Distant Civilizations, Not Native Americans, With Building These Monumental Cities

Around 1100 or 1200 A.D., the largest city north of Mexico was Cahokia, sitting in what is now southern Illinois, across the Mississippi River from St. Louis. Built around 1050 A.D. and occupied through 1400 A.D., Cahokia had a peak population of between 25,000 and 50,000 people. Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Cahokia was composed of three boroughs (Cahokia, East St. Louis, and St. Louis) connected to each other via waterways and walking trails that extended across the Mississippi River floodplain for some 20 square km. Its population consisted of agriculturalists who grew large amounts of maize, and craft specialists who made beautiful pots, shell jewelry, arrow-points, and flint clay figurines.

The city of Cahokia is one of many large earthen mound complexes that dot the landscapes of the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys and across the Southeast.

Source: How White Settlers Buried the Truth About the Midwest’s Mysterious Mounds | Essay | Zócalo Public Square

Exhibition Reveals Stories of America’s Very Own Ancient Earthworks; Alanna Martinez; Observer

USA – Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site

Americans need not look too far to find evidence of their country’s own early history.

Located just outside St. Louis are the remains of a 5,000-year-old city.

Ancient cultures constructed elaborate pyramidal earthworks, often referred to as mounds, across the globe. The remains of these soil-made structures have been found in places like Mexico, the Amazonian rainforest, across the British Isles and even on the European continent. While the original purpose of these mounds varies from place to place—some were burial chambers and others massive foundations for important buildings—there’s no question that these mysterious earthen structures played a central role in the cultures that built them.

But Americans need not look too far to find evidence of their country’s own early history.

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