10 Amazing Things to do in Tunisia; Amy Trumpeter; Medium.com

Tunisia is an excellent option for anyone wanting a very adventurous Mediterranean holiday within just a few hours flight time from London…

Source: 10 Amazing Things to do in Tunisia

The Implicit Threat of Being Designated a World Heritage Site; Michael Press; Hyperallergic

1-circus-720x458

Read more from source

Battle of Carthage: Tunisia Demolishes Homes to Protect Ancient Site; Reuters

Saber Sessi was working the night shift at a municipality vehicle depot in Carthage, Tunisia, when he signed off on five bulldozers in the early hours of July 9. Unbeknownst to him, the intended target for those bulldozers was his home. “I opened the gate, I handed [the keys] over and then I saw them drive around to my house,” said Sessi, 50, who lived beside the depot in the working-class neighborhood of Mohamed Ali, in the northern surburbs of the Tunisian capital. Sessi’s house and nine other buildings were razed…

Source: Battle of Carthage: Tunisia Demolishes Homes to Protect Ancient Site

Battle of Carthage: Tunisia demolishes homes to protect ancient site; Reuters

capture-14-750x468

Read more from source

In pics: ruins of Antonin Baths in Tunisia; ZX; Xinhua

137946507_15542747867001n

Read more from source

‘We cannot put a value on what we will lose’: Rising seas could devastate historical sites across the Mediterranean, study finds; Washington Post

In particular danger is Dubrovnik, clinging to the Croatian coast, a medieval city long known as the ‘Pearl of the Adriatic’ and a main setting for HBO’s ‘Game of Thrones’…

Source: ‘We cannot put a value on what we will lose’: Rising seas could devastate historical sites across the Mediterranean, study finds

Chinese tourists charmed by Tunisian historical heritage; Xinhua

ccrbeee005022_20180929_crmfn0a001_11n

Read more from source

Time to re-visit Tunisia; The Cultural Voyager

Tunisia – Archaeological Site of Carthage

With the FCO lifting the warning for most of the country, Liz Gill explores the wealth of history, heritage and modern day amenities that Tunisia has to offer.

In one of the rooms of the Bardo museum in Tunis stand headless Roman statues; the heads are in glass cabinets on the walls. This, Anmar our guide explains, is because when one emperor died and was replaced by another only the statues’ heads were changed: the bodies were idealised anyway so they could be used again and again.

In another room he stops and points with a proud flourish to ‘our Mona Lisa’ – a mosaic of Virgil flanked by two muses and writing the Aeneid, the only known likeness of one of the most important poets of antiquity.

Read more