Republic Day 2020 Tableaux Feature Rafale Jet, ‘Rani Ki Vav’, Others; PTI


Goa’s “Save The Frog” campaign, Jammu and Kashmir’s “Back To Village” programme, scaled down models of Rafale aircraft in the Indian Air Force’s tableau were among the 22 tableaux that rolled down Delhi’s Rajpath during the 71st Republic Day parade…

Source: Republic Day 2020 Tableaux Feature Rafale Jet, ‘Rani Ki Vav’, Others

Meet Pankaj Modi, Narendra Modi’s Brother, Who Has Come to Delhi With Gujarat’s R-Day Tableau; Poulomi Ghosh; India.com

Rani Ki Vav or Queen’s Stepwell was built by Rani Udayamati as a memorial to her husband King Bhimdev I in the 11th century in Patan district and it was added into the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2014.

Source: Meet Pankaj Modi, Narendra Modi’s Brother, Who Has Come to Delhi With Gujarat’s R-Day Tableau

Photographs by Victoria Lautman Depict India’s Subterranean Stepwells; Christele Harrouk; Arch Daily

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Battle of the wells; Anupama Mohanram; The Hindu

Why open wells make more sense for today’s urban scene, says Anupama Mohanram…

Source: Battle of the wells

Hotel Review: The House of MG, Ahmedabad in India; Aruna Rathod; Luxury Lifestyle Magazine

Ahmedabad, a city in Gujarat boasts of a rich cultural heritage. The Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat was added to the UNESCO World Heritage…

Source: Hotel Review: The House of MG, Ahmedabad in India

Pride of Patan: The journey of Rani Ki Vav from a being buried art treasure to the reverse of the new Rs 100 note; Poulomi Banerjee; Hindustan Times

Rani Ki Vav, a stepwell in the little Gujarat town of Patan, features on the new Rs100 note. It was also declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2014. But behind the recognition received by this monument is a story of recovery…

Source: Pride of Patan: The journey of Rani Ki Vav from a being buried art treasure to the reverse of the new Rs 100 note

Rani Ki Vav | Little known facts about the monument featured on the new ₹100 note; Architectural Design

Everything you should know about Rani Ki Vav, the UNESCO recognised monument that inspired the motif printed on the new ₹100 note released by the RBI

Source: Rani Ki Vav | Little known facts about the monument featured on the new ₹100 note

‘Rani ki Vav’ on new Rs 100 note: What’s the legend?; Business Today

Rani ki Vav was added to the UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites in 2014 after it was nominated for the title by Archaeological Survey of India (ASI).

Source: ‘Rani ki Vav’ on new Rs 100 note: What’s the legend?

Ranki Vav of Patan to be on new Rs 100 currency notes: report; Desh Gujarat

Mumbai: The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) is set to release a new Rs 100 note in violet colour by next month. The new note will house the impression of Gujarat’s Rani Ki Vav (stepwell), said a Dainik Bhaskar report, adding that the size of this currency will be smaller than the present one.

Source: Ranki Vav of Patan to be on new Rs 100 currency notes: report

Early days of vav: Stepwells hold legends as well as lessons for our time; Arjun Parmari; Times of India

India – Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat

In a state which is largely arid and experiences hot weather for long periods, it is only natural for the inhabitants to innovate and find solutions to an overall lack of water. With a monsoon-window that stays open for barely three months of the year, the only way to ensure adequate water supply through the year — since historical times — has been via a series of tanks, ponds, artificial lakes and significantly, stepwells.

As observed previously in Dholavira and Lothal, it was channelling water into tanks that helped create and manage medium to large cities in the Harappan age. That enabled the community to have a reservoir of water for bathing, drinking and irrigation. In later, smaller settlements, stepwells — or vavs, as they are popularly called in our state — played pretty much the same role, especially for domestic usage. Today, Rani ki Vav in Gujarat has been recognized as a Unesco World Heritage site.

Read more from source: Early days of vav: Stepwells hold legends as well as lessons for our time – Times of India

Culture, selfies, or a really good hill? #travel #India #humor; Barb Taub

India – Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat

So much of India is defined by its relationship to water. It’s a symbol for almost every aspect of life from purity to fertility to spirituality. Rivers are goddesses, while the Ganges is said to promote health, and speed the path to enlightenment. Ancient engineering feats of water harvesting meant the difference between destruction or survival of cities and empires. A common feature of even the earliest temples is the “tank”, the open water pool where it’s customary to take a purifying dip before entering to worship. Even the humblest of restaurants have hand washing stations. Visitors in Gujarat are always greeted with an offer of a cup of water.

So picture, if you can, a soaring temple built over seven levels, all covered with literally thousands of carvings and sculptures—only the temple soars DOWN, with several levels extending further down into the water at the bottom. They were called stepwells, and could serve as a special retreat for a princess, or as a town’s social center.

Source: Culture, selfies, or a really good hill? #travel #India #humor

This American author is on the haunting trail of India’s stepwells; Soma Das; Hindustan Times

India – Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat

American journalist and author Victoria Lautman’s 2017 book, The Vanishing Stepwells of India, explores the ancient and mysterious water-harvesting systems scattered across the country. We catch up with Lautman ahead of her India tour.

It is safe to say that a visit to the Red Fort tops every tourist’s itinerary in Delhi. Yet, few are aware of another architectural gem in the capital: The Red Fort Baoli, that lies just a few yards away from the monument. It is one among over a 100 stepwells that can be found across Delhi alone. Yet, these architecture and engineering marvels are rarely visited, and often lie hidden in plain sight. Sadly, compared to India’s forts, palaces and temples, there is relatively very little information available about its stepwells.

Dating back to 600 CE, these subterranean stepwells can be found across the country.

Source: This American author is on the haunting trail of India’s stepwells. See pics

How to reach Rani ki Vav in Gujarat by Road, Train and Flight; Dilip Merala; India.com

India – Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat

Rani ki Vav in Gujarat’s Patan is an ancient stepwell and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. here is how to reach Rani Ki Vav by road, train and flight.

Gujarat can surprise you with its offbeat destinations that you may not even have heard of. Most of these destinations are of historical significance and take you back in time. One such amazing place worth visiting in Gujarat is the Rani ki Vav. A UNESCO World heritage site, Rani ki Vav is a stepwell that dates back to the year 1063 when it was commissioned by Rani Udayamati in memory of her husband King Bhimdev I of the Solanki dynasty. After being flooded by the Saraswati river, the stepwell was excavated by the Archaeological Survey of India only in the 1980s.

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21 Amazing Historical Places In India You Never Heard About!; Tripoto

India – Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat

The historical places and beautiful monuments spread across India are a delight for any traveller. Taj Mahal is the most iconic historical place in India, but there are many that are still unknown and unexplored. They are as beautiful and enticing as Taj and their locations can enthral you if only you knew how to find them.

Here is a list of Indian historical places: 

 Hampi

Hampi, a temple town in Karnataka, is a fascinating spot. An open museum, Hampi can be best described as a quaint place, lying amidst striking ruins of the past. The unearthly landscape, the magnificent boulders, the carnival of carvings, the story of the past, Hampi is a sight to behold.

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Glory of days past; AutoCar

India – Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat

We drive to the beautiful UNESCO heritage site, Rani ki Vav, in Gujarat in a Hyundai Creta.

In 2014, Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted, “Next time you visit Gujarat, you must visit Rani ki Vav, an excellent symbol of our great art and culture.” Well, we took his advice rather seriously, because this month, we found ourselves driving all the way to Gujarat specifically to visit this place that he so praised.

Driving to Gujarat is always a pleasure because that state has some seriously good highways. Things were even better this time around because the car we were driving was a seriously good highway cruiser – the Hyundai Creta. The Creta is one of Hyundai’s bestsellers, and it is easy to see why. The Creta is a sharp-looking small SUV that is big on features and comfort.

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Best Places To Visit In Gujarat: Biggest Tourist Attractions in Narendra Modi’s Home State; Dilip Merala; India.com

India – Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat

Gujarat is one of India’s underrated tourist attractions. The state is full of amazing holiday spots that one must explore. We give you some of the best places to visit in Gujarat, home of Mahatma Gandhi and Narendra Modi.

When you think of tourist places in India, what comes to your mind? Chances are that you will not think beyond Shimla, Manali, Kerala, Goa, Rajasthan, Ladakh or northeast India. And rightly so! All the wonderful destinations are so alluring and have so much to offer that you hardly feel the need to think about other options. However, once you move past the cliched holiday spots, you realize that India is full of astonishing places that let you in on its rich history and diverse culture.

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Rani Ki Vav, Patan – UNESCO World Heritage Site; Umang Dave; Tripoto

India – Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat

“Stepwell Rani-ki-Vav has been approved for inscription on the World Heritage list. The recognition was granted by the UNESCO at the World Heritage Committee Session currently on at Doha, Qatar,” the Culture Ministry said in Delhi on Sunday.

“UNESCO has recognised this masterpiece as an exceptional example of technological development in utilising ground water resources in a single component – a water management system — and it illustrates the exceptional capacity to break large spaces into smaller volumes following ideal aesthetic proportions,” it said in a statement.

Although this news has been the motivation for writing this post about our trip to this now UNESCO World Heritage site, but that doesn’t mean that we never tried to promote this as one of the best place to experience in Gujarat.

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The depth of love; Chitra Ramaswamy; Deccan Herald

India – Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat

All’s well!

The 11th-century Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) — in Patan district of Gujarat — made it to the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list on June 22 this year. And pray, why not? This architectural wonder designed as an inverted temple, with its intricately carved panels, looks like a subterranean edifice honouring the elixir of life rather than a construct simply to store water.

Doubtlessly, the baolis of North India, the bawdis of Rajasthan and the vavs of Gujarat are our country’s unique and stupendous contribution to the world of art and architecture. While Rajasthan has earned the sobriquet ‘city of stepwells’, Gujarat, which boasts hundreds of them, walks away with Rani-ki-Vav as its place of pride.

Oh! The marvel
It’s with a lot of skepticism that we decide to visit yet another stepwell during our trip to Gujarat.

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