Activist seeks CEC’s help to ban illegal mining in Kaziranga-Karbi Anglong landscape; Naresh Mitra; Times of India

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GUWAHATI: Environment activist Rohit Choudhury has sought Supreme Court-constituted Central Empowered Committee’s (CEC) help to ban unabated stone ext.

Source: Activist seeks CEC’s help to ban illegal mining in Kaziranga-Karbi Anglong landscape – Times of India

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All Inclusive North East India Tourism Guide With Travel Tips; CNK Travelscapes

Planning a North East trip in India? Here is our ultimate North East India tourism guide that gives in depth information on North East India.

Source: All Inclusive North East India Tourism Guide With Travel Tips

Divisional Forest Officer recommends closure of stone mines adjacent to Kaziranga National Park; PTI

The DFO said he made the recommendation as the unscientifically mined stone quarries in Karbi Anglong Hills across the UNESCO World Heritage Site were causing damage to the animal corridor.

Source: Divisional Forest Officer recommends closure of stone mines adjacent to Kaziranga National Park

Most Popular Tourist Destinations in Northeast India; Devendra Singh; Go 4 Travel Blog

The beauty of these most popular Northeast Indian states is simply untouched, virgin beauty characterized by majestic mountains, lush green slopes, dense forest covers, falls and streams. Leading travel and tourism companies will always include the most popular Northeast Indian tourist destinations in their itinerary.

Source: Most Popular Tourist Destinations in Northeast India | Go 4 Travel Blog

See the One-Horned Rhinoceros at Kaziranga National Park; Sharell Cook; Trip Savvy

India – Kaziranga National Park

See the One-Horned Rhinoceros at Assam’s Kaziranga National Park

Declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Kaziranga National Park is a substantial sized park, covering approximately 430 square kilometers. In particular, it stretches for 40 kilometers (25 miles) in length from east to west, and is 13 kilometers (8 miles) wide.

Much of the park’s terrain consists of swamp and grasslands, making it the perfect habitat for the one-horned rhinoceros. The largest population in the world of these prehistoric looking creatures exists there, along with almost 40 major mammals.

These include wild elephants, tiger, buffaloes, gaur, monkeys, deer, otters, badgers, leopards, and wild boar. The birdlife is also impressive. Thousands of migratory birds arrive at the park every year, from distant lands as far away as Siberia.

This Kaziranga National Park travel guide will help you plan your trip there.

Location

In the state of Assam, in India’s Northeast region, on the banks of the Brahmaputra River. 217 kilometers from Guwahati, 96 kilometers from Jorhat, and 75 kilometers from Furkating. The main entrance to the park is at Kohora on National Highway 37, where there’s a Tourist Complex and booking offices.

Getting There

Read more from source: See the One-Horned Rhinoceros at Kaziranga National Park

On World Heritage Day, RCI brings a list of top destinations to explore; Financial Express

India – Kaziranga National Park

Tourism is one of the biggest industry in the world which continues to grow at an accelerated pace with more than a billion tourists now travelling to an international destination each year

Tourism is one of the biggest industry in the world which continues to grow at an accelerated pace with more than a billion tourists now travelling to an international destination each year. One of the key motivation to travel is mankind’s inherent curiosity and desire to explore cultural identities across the world. Natural and cultural heritage sites are prized tourism assets that distinguish one destination from another. This World Heritage Day, RCI brings to you a list of destinations to discover some of mankind’s highest achievements and explore natural wonders.

India

World Heritage sites aren’t simply ancient stones and cultural sites. UNESCO’s list also includes natural wonders. Situated in the heart of Assam, the Kaziranga National Park is one of the last areas in eastern India which is undisturbed by a human presence.

Read more from source: On World Heritage Day, RCI brings a list of top destinations to explore

Population of one-horned rhino in Kaziranga rose marginally by 12 from the last census in 2015; Scroll

India – Kaziranga National Park

Authorities said they came to a low count because they could not burn enough of the grass in the national park to spot the animals.

The population of the one-horned rhinoceros in Assam’s Kaziranga National Park has risen marginally by 12 to 2,413, according to the 2018 census. This is a much lower increase than the 111 rise the 2015 census recorded, the Hindustan Times reported on Thursday.

The census was carried out on Tuesday and Wednesday. Authorities said they came to a lower count this time because they could not burn the tall grass in the region to spot the animals – only 20% of the vegetation could be burnt as compared to the 60% to 70% every year. Enumerators who were part of the census suggested they may carry out another count next year after reviewing the field conditions that are essential to ascertain the rhino population, according to News 18.

“Given various factors, this [the rise in rhino population] is plus or minus 100,” Assam’s Chief Wildlife Warden, NK Vasu, told The New Indian Express.

Read more from source: Population of one-horned rhino in Kaziranga rose marginally by 12 from the last census in 2015

India starts Kaziranga Park rhino count; BBC

India – Kaziranga National Park

Authorities in India’s Kaziranga National Park are using elephants and sport vehicles to conduct a census of its one-horned rhinoceros population.

The Unesco World Heritage Site, in north-east Assam state, is home to two-thirds of the world’s population of the species.

The census is carried out every three years and is due to last two days.

In the last survey in 2015, authorities counted 2,401 rhinos, up from the 2012 results.

“We expect [the] rhino population will be increased in Kaziranga,” Assam environment minister Pramila Rani Brahma said.

Authorities divided the 170 sq mile (430 sq km) park into 74 compartments, with 300 government and NGO officials conducting the survey.

Since its foundation in 1905, Kaziranga has had great success in conserving and boosting animal populations.

As well as being a haven for one-horned rhinoceroses, the park was declared a tiger reserve by the Indian government, and is also home to elephants, wild water buffalo and numerous bird species.

The endangered South Asian river dolphin or Ganges dolphin also lives in the rivers that criss-cross the park.

However, this reputation for conservation has not been without controversy.

Read more from source: India starts Kaziranga Park rhino count

Best Places to Visit in India in October 2017; Anoop Menon; India.com

India – Kaziranga National Park

October 2017 is here and the monsoon season is officially behind us. With some big festivals on the way, we look at the best places to visit in India in October 2017 for an escape.

It is October 2017, and we are just past our first long weekend for the month. But October promises some big holidays too, along with interesting festivals, including the biggest in India. Weather-wise, we are going through that transition period between the monsoon and winter, when the temperature rises and so does humidity. It feels like a mini-summer, which is good weather to go out and explore before winter kicks in. Here, then, are a few of the best places to visit in India in October 2017.

Corbett National Park

Jim Corbett National Park in Uttarakhand is probably the most well-known destination of its kind in India.

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To conserve tropical forests and wildlife, protect the rights of people who rely on them; Prakash Kashwan; The Conversation

India – Kaziranga National Park

Many of our planet’s most beautiful areas are also sites of intense conflicts. In a recent example, traditional herdsmen in February took over the land around Mount Kenya, which is a World Heritage Site and biodiversity hotspot, burning down the tourist lodge and bringing in thousands of cattle to graze.

These tensions also occur in wealthy nations, including the United States, where conflicts continue to simmer over the control of federal lands and national wildlife refuges. But in former colonies in Asia and Africa, the contemporary effects of colonial land acquisitions are made even more complex by continuing social divisions based on caste or ethnicity. They also are worsened by social and cultural differences between staff of forestry agencies and the indigenous and forest-dependent groups who are affected most by these conflicts.

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