Royal Museums Greenwich; Classic FM

Classic FM | Royal Museums Greenwich

Source: Royal Museums Greenwich

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The Painted Hall at the Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich, London, UK; The Cool Hunter

We will choose an exquisitely restored old building over a new one every time. With a restoration approach that does not interfere with the history of a building but enhances it, older structures gain a completely new level of interest and fascination. A well-refurbished old structure inspires respect and wonder, and speaks to us in […]

Source: The Painted Hall at the Old Royal Naval College, Greenwich, London, UK – The Cool Hunter

National Maritime Museum; Future Learn

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Maritime Greenwich: What to see at the Unesco World Heritage Site; Jessica Taylor; Evening Standard

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As part of the capital’s rich and diverse culture, Londoners are lucky enough to have four UNESCO World Heritage Sites right on their doorsteps. One of these gems sits on the south bank of the Thames…

Source: Maritime Greenwich: What to see at the Unesco World Heritage Site

Taking the Kids — to Greenwich, England, and the pluses of getting off the beaten track — a bit; Eileen Ogintz; Tribune Content Agency

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London’s Secret Nuclear Reactor; Kaushik; Amazing Planet

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The 10 most beautiful universities in the UK; Times Higher Education

UK – Maritime Greenwich

They say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but you’d be hard-pressed to find somebody who can’t see the beauty in these 10 UK universities.

When you think about classic, beautiful university buildings, the UK will usually be one of the first countries you think of. Home to some of the oldest universities in the world, many of its universities have been used as filming locations for period dramas and epic films.

Here at Times Higher Education Student we have thought long and hard about which universities are deemed the most beautiful in the UK, with rolling green spaces, and Gothic and modern buildings.

1. Royal Holloway

Located in Egham, a Surrey town between Windsor and Heathrow, Royal Holloway, University of London is often hailed as one of the most beautiful universities in the world. Founder’s Building was originally home to a women-only college.

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Cutty Sark mutiny: staff asked to join picket lines as dispute hits tourists; Ben Quinn; Guardian

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While visitor numbers soar, workers are paid below the living wage in employment practices recalling the navy in the 19th century.

Braving the high seas and undertaking physically demanding work, the crew of the Cutty Sark might have expected pay to match. Instead, by 1882 the men who sailed what was once Britain’s fastest ship earned just one pound and eight shillings (£1.40) a month – less than agricultural labourers of the time.

More than a century later the custodians of Britain’s naval heritage are at the centre of a struggle over pay and working conditions at the vessel’s final resting place. In Britain’s first industrial action of 2018, some of the lowest-paid employees of the Royal Museums Greenwich will go on strike on Monday to protest against changes to their hours, meaning longer shifts and shorter breaks for the same wage.

The museum in south-east London buzzed as usual this weekend.

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Ten Interesting Facts and Figures about Maritime Greenwich; John Rabon; Anglotopia Magazine

UK – Maritime Greenwich

Greenwich, London is an area of London just south-east of the City of London.  It’s first mentioned in a Saxon charter in 918 as “Grenowic” or “green settlement.”  As London grew and prospered, Greenwich eventually became an area dedicated to maritime pursuits, eventually becoming the home of the Royal Navy College and the Royal Observatory.  This history is on display at the National Maritime Museum, but that is not the only interesting aspect of the area.  Join us as we examine ten interesting facts about Greenwich, the Royal Borough, and the UNESCO World Heritage site that are worth a visit.

Heritage

Speaking of which, Maritime Greenwich is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, having been designated as such in 1997.

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In a maritime town; Daily Sun

UK – Maritime Greenwich

Greenwich, the famous British district southeast of London, makes for a breathtaking out-of-city excursion. Speckled with historic buildings, scenic bridges, verdant gardens, museums, galleries and the sparkling river Thames, London’s wholesome sights are a delight to explore.

But equally exciting is the fact that the Capital of the Old Blighty is also the gateway to numerous out-of-town attractions.

The maritime town of Greenwich, given the fact that London attracts over 30 million tourists a year, it is highly recommended that one make prior bookings for various sights and tours. This is where “The Discover London” experience by ShangriLa Hotel at the Shard came in handy.

The cruise liner skimmed the glutinous river. Disembarking at Greenwich station, Cutty Sark, its masts and deck silhouetted against a salmon pink evening sky.

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How a tiny island nation become the biggest empire the world; Steve McKenna; Stuff

UK – Maritime Greenwich

This is how epic seafaring endeavours helmed by iconic figures put the “Great” into Britain.

Britain’s shock foray into “Brexitland” may have been driven by voters’ concerns about immigration and their antipathy – or ambivalence – to the European Union.

But the referendum result can, in part, be explained by a nostalgia for the days when Britannia ruled the waves (free from the shackles of the bureaucrats of Brussels).

It was the country’s epic seafaring endeavours, helmed by iconic figures such as Captain Cook, Admiral Lord Nelson and Sir Francis Drake, that helped put the “great” into Great Britain, transforming it from a tiny island nation to the biggest empire the world has ever seen.

GREENWICH

A Unesco World Heritage listing has been bestowed on this lovely London village thanks to its hoard of maritime treasures.

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Up-close look of the ceiling at the Painted Hall in London; Lena Masri; ABC News

UK – Maritime Greenwich

London’s largest painted ceiling is undergoing a major transformation.

The Painted Hall at the Old Royal Naval College, part of Maritime Greenwich, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is being conserved for the first time since the 1950s. This means that visitors can get closer to the ceiling of the Painted Hall than ever before — and that even conservators who know the paintings very well are discovering the details of the artwork.

“It’s a pretty amazing and weird experience,” Will Palin, director of conservation at the Old Royal Naval College, told ABC News. “When the scaffolding first went up it was very disorientating because, of course, they were never meant to be seen this close. ”

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