Did the Romans really reach Scotland?; Kirsten Henton; BBC

Hadrian’s Wall may be older, bigger, stronger and better known, but the Unesco-listed Antonine Wall was the real final frontier of the Roman Empire.

Source: Did the Romans really reach Scotland?

Advertisements

The UK locations on the UNESCO World Heritage List; Kirsty Bosley; Daily Post

How many of these 27 places have you been to?

Source: The UK locations on the UNESCO World Heritage List

It’s Complicated: From the Roman Empire to Brexit, Britain Has Always Struggled to Define Its Relationship With Europe; Ciara Nugent; Time

For centuries, Britain has alternated between moving closer to and pulling away from Europe…

Source: It’s Complicated: From the Roman Empire to Brexit, Britain Has Always Struggled to Define Its Relationship With Europe

Scotland Still Bears an Enormous Scar of Its Roman Past; ssm67alba; Atlas Obscura

Remnants of the Antonine Wall still stretch across the country.

Source: Scotland Still Bears an Enormous Scar of Its Roman Past

An Overview of the History and Archaeology of the Antonine Wall; Darrell Jesse Rohl; Brewminate

A section of the Antonine Wall at Rough Castle near Falkirk / Photo by Kim Traynor, Wikimedia Commons

The Antonine Wall is an ancient and historical  monument originating as imperial Rome’s one-­‐‑…

Source: An Overview of the History and Archaeology of the Antonine Wall

£2 million lottery funding to celebrate heritage of Roman walls; Express & Star

The money will support projects at the Antonine Wall in central Scotland and Hadrian’s Wall in the north of England.

Source: £2 million lottery funding to celebrate heritage of Roman walls

A border fence from ancient times: Hadrian’s Wall in England; Jerry Harmer; AP

“Looks like we brought the weather with us from California,” the elderly tourist says, pulling on a hat and strolling past me. He disappears up a grass slope, beneath a brilliant, blue sky, his wife beside him. It’s the first of several American accents I hear that morning. Perhaps they’ve come to see what a real border fence looks like.

Source: A border fence from ancient times: Hadrian’s Wall in England

12 historical places to visit on the August bank holiday weekend; Emma Mason; History Extra

Monday is our last bank holiday until Christmas, so make the long weekend count by spending the day at one of the thousands of historical sites dotted across Britain. Here, we’ve rounded up 12 of the best castles, palaces and landscapes you can visit over the bank holiday weekend…

Source: 12 historical places to visit on the August bank holiday weekend

A border fence from ancient times: Hadrian’s Wall in England; Jerry Harmer; Chronicle Herald

BRAMPTON, England — “Looks like we brought the weather with us from California,” the elderly tourist says, pulling on a hat and strolling past me. He disappears up a grass slope, beneath a brilliant, blue sky, his wife beside him. It’s the first of several American accents I hear that morning.

Source: A border fence from ancient times: Hadrian’s Wall in England

The Roman Army on the British Frontier in the 1st and 2nd centuries AD; History of the Ancient World

UK – Frontiers of the Roman Empire

The Roman fort at Vindolanda is located one mile south of Hadrian’s Wall in northern England. Vindolanda was declared a Unesco world heritage site because of the unique organic material recovered there and its great importance in the history of this region and the Roman world in general. In particular the site is known as the home of the Vindolanda writing tablets, approximately two-thousand ink-on-wood documents that have preserved information including personal correspondence, military strength reports and inventory lists pertaining to the site’s soldiers and civilians. These tablets have been preserved as a result of anaerobic conditions caused by the construction of at least nine consecutive periods of Roman occupation on the site. In addition to written documents Vindolanda has produced the world’s largest assemblage of Roman leather goods and countless unique artifacts including textiles and a Roman helmet crest.

Read more from source: The Roman Army on the British Frontier in the 1st and 2nd centuries AD – History of the Ancient World