Can we save the coral reefs?; Amy Spurling; The IET

Covering less than 0.1 per cent of the ocean surface, coral reefs support 25 per cent of all marine life. Australian scientists and engineers are giving their all to save the Great Barrier Reef – the largest living thing on Earth – from extinction.

Source: Can we save the coral reefs?

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How travellers can help protect the Great Barrier Reef; Peter; Atlas & Boots

Our tips on how you can help protect the Great Barrier Reef, the largest living structure on the planet.The Great Barrier Reef in Australia is a natural treasure and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Source: How travellers can help protect the Great Barrier Reef

How To Visit The Great Barrier Reef – 5 Epic Holiday Ideas; Jayne; Girl Tweets World

Queensland holiday ideas for backpackers, beach lovers & more. How to visit the Great Barrier Reef whatever your style or budget is.

Source: How To Visit The Great Barrier Reef – 5 Epic Holiday Ideas

Australia Struggles To Conserve Its Great Barrier Reef; AFP

Australia is breaching commitments to protect the embattled Great Barrier Reef from the effects of land clearing, environmental groups claimed Monday and called on the UN to probe the alleged failures.

Source: Australia Struggles To Conserve Its Great Barrier Reef

This new treatment could save the Great Barrier Reef by boosting the coral population; Zaina Alibhai; iNews

A trial of the “coral IVF” offers hope the treatment could have great impact on coral population on a larger scale.

Source: This new treatment could save the Great Barrier Reef by boosting the coral population

The most spectacular places on the planet that have the most to lose as humans reshape the world; Kevin Loria; Business Insider

Threats to many of the world’s natural wonders are growing, according to a 2017 report evaluating threats faced by natural UNESCO World Heritage Sites. These sites include many of the most iconic wild places on the planet, including the Great Barrier Reef and Galapagos Islands.

Source: The most spectacular places on the planet that have the most to lose as humans reshape the world

Paradise six times the size of Sydney CBD to be wiped; Natalie Wolfe; The Chronicle

Australia – Great Barrier Reef

LAST week, the Australian government promised it would spend more than $500 million to protect our greatest national treasure, the Great Barrier Reef.

But now the government is being urged by environmental groups to put its money where its mouth is and reconsider a proposal to clear 2000 hectares of pristine Queensland forest on Cape York Peninsula.

Federal officials are planning to back the bulldozing of enough forest to fill the CBDs of Sydney and Melbourne three times over.

The clearing will see swathes of eucalypt forest, melaleuca swamplands and the habitats of a number of endangered species completely destroyed.

The draft report from the Department of the Environment and Energy recommends the government give the green light to the Kingvale Station clearing.

If it’s approved by Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg, Australia will not only have lost an area of forest almost six times the size of one of our capitals, but run-off into the Great Barrier Reef is also expected to increase.

Read more from source: Paradise six times the size of Sydney CBD to be wiped

Australia Announces $379 Million Funding to Save the Great Barrier Reef; Emma Taggart; My Modern Met

Australia – Great Barrier Reef

In a bid to help save Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, the Sydney government recently announced a $379 million funding plan. Approved by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, the initiative will help pay for a number of new protection strategies against environmental dangers such as coral bleaching—a long-term problem that has so far destroyed over 900 miles of the world-heritage ecosystem.

Caused by increasing seas temperatures, bleaching is a stress response from the living corals. They expel the symbiotic algae living in their tissues, causing them to lose their vibrant colors, which turns them completely white. Other major causes include a recent outbreak of coral-eating starfish, called the crown-of-thorns starfish. It spreads its body across the coral and releases a digestive enzyme, which slowly breaks it down.

However, the first cause that the government’s funds will aim to change is the surrounding farming practices. Due to the close proximity of sugar cane and cattle farms to the shore, there are large amounts of industrial agricultural waste that pollutes the ocean and smothers the coral.

Read more from source: Australia Announces $379 Million Funding to Save the Great Barrier Reef

Australia to invest miliions in Great Barrier Reef restoration and protection; Steve George; CNN

Australia – Great Barrier Reef

Australia has pledged more than 500 million Australian dollars ($379 miillion) to help preserve the Great Barrier Reef, in an attempt to help better protect the world heritage site from the effects of climate change.

Marine heat waves caused by global warming killed off and damaged corals in 2016. Most of the impact was along 500 miles of the northern Great Barrier Reef, its most pristine region.

The new funding is part of an ambitious conservation plan that will see the Australian government partner with the Great Barrier Reef Foundation to improve and monitor the long-term health of the reef.

Described as the largest single investment for reef conservation and management in the country’s history, the money will be used to improve water quality, control a major predatorand expand reef restoration.

The Great Barrier Reef is home to the world’s largest collection of coral reefs, with about 400 types of coral and 1,500 species of fish. It is also home to a number of endangered species, including the large green turtle and the dugong, a cousin of the manatee.

Read more from source

New fund to protect Great Barrier Reef; BBC

Australia – Great Barrier Reef

The World Heritage site has lost 30% of its coral due to environmental degradation.

Australia has pledged A$500 million (£275m; $379m) to protect the World Heritage-listed Great Barrier Reef.

In recent years, the reef has lost 30% of its coral due to bleaching linked to rising sea temperatures and damage from crown-of-thorns starfish.

The funding will be used to reduce the runoff of agricultural pesticides and improve water quality.

Some of the money will be used to help farmers near the reef modify their practices.

Threats to the reef include “large amounts of sediment, nitrogen and pesticide run-off” as well as the crown-of-thorns starfish species, Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg said.

The reef can be seen from space and was listed as a world heritage site in 1981 by the United Nations cultural body Unesco.

There are 1,052 sites of environmental and cultural importance such as the reef on Unesco’s World Heritage List.

In 2017, the organisation decided not to place the Great Barrier Reef on its official list of 55 World Heritage sites “in danger”.

Read more from source: New fund to protect Great Barrier Reef