Scenery of Amphitheatre of El Jem in Tunisia; Wang Yamei; Xinhua

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The 55 Best Things to Do in Africa; Steph; Big World Small Pockets

Whether it’s the north, the south, the east or the west you’re headed to, here’s Steph’s list off the 55 best things to do in Africa …

Source: The 55 Best Things to Do in Africa

The Implicit Threat of Being Designated a World Heritage Site; Michael Press; Hyperallergic

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Battle of Carthage: Tunisia Demolishes Homes to Protect Ancient Site; Reuters

Saber Sessi was working the night shift at a municipality vehicle depot in Carthage, Tunisia, when he signed off on five bulldozers in the early hours of July 9. Unbeknownst to him, the intended target for those bulldozers was his home. “I opened the gate, I handed [the keys] over and then I saw them drive around to my house,” said Sessi, 50, who lived beside the depot in the working-class neighborhood of Mohamed Ali, in the northern surburbs of the Tunisian capital. Sessi’s house and nine other buildings were razed…

Source: Battle of Carthage: Tunisia Demolishes Homes to Protect Ancient Site

The Best Roman Amphitheaters You Can Go To For A Piece Of Ancient History; Azhar Alvi; CEOWORLD magazine

One thousand five hundred years ago if you asked people what they did for entertainment, there would not be an awful lot to talk about. Humanity was still in the discovery phase, and much of its activity centered on exploration. In the vicinity of the 5 AD period, where much of the human civilization was…

Source: The Best Roman Amphitheaters You Can Go To For A Piece Of Ancient History | CEOWORLD magazine

Experience the Outstanding on a Tunisia Vacation; Robert Glazier; Goway

Tunisia tours offer the opportunity to enjoy a wonderful beach vacation and combine it with other interesting things to see and do. Tunisia will certainly provide you with sun-drenched days on the beach but it will also allow you to satisfy your cultural desires with historical sites and desert experiences. It’s a wonderful combination to …

Source: Experience the Outstanding on a Tunisia Vacation | Goway

Battle of Carthage: Tunisia demolishes homes to protect ancient site; Reuters

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El Jem Amphitheatre; Nate Robert; Atlas Obscura

The largest and best-preserved Roman amphitheater in Africa was designed to seat 35,000 people.

Source: El Jem Amphitheatre

The 20 Best Places to Visit in August; Elizabeth Atkin; Wanderlust

Source: The 20 Best Places to Visit in August

Why now is the perfect time to visit a resurgent Tunis; John Brunton; The National

Tourists are flocking back to the North African city after being encouraged by low prices and diverse attractions…

Source: Why now is the perfect time to visit a resurgent Tunis

Go all-inclusive in Tunisia this summer from £125pp; Clare Mellor; The Sun

BRIT holidaymakers flocked back to the North African country of Tunisia last year and it’s one of the hottest holiday destinations for summer 2019. Located between the Med and Sahara Desert, …

Source: Go all-inclusive in Tunisia this summer from £125pp

Six sites across the Arab world to explore on World Heritage Day; Arab News

Thursday marks World Heritage Day, so read on for some of the region’s most fascinating UNESCO-listed sites.

Source: Six sites across the Arab world to explore on World Heritage Day

In pics: ruins of Antonin Baths in Tunisia; ZX; Xinhua

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The Mediterranean’s drowning heritage; Omnia Gohar; Nature Asia

Sea level rise threatens Mediterranean UNESCO heritage sites.

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‘We cannot put a value on what we will lose’: Rising seas could devastate historical sites across the Mediterranean, study finds; Washington Post

In particular danger is Dubrovnik, clinging to the Croatian coast, a medieval city long known as the ‘Pearl of the Adriatic’ and a main setting for HBO’s ‘Game of Thrones’…

Source: ‘We cannot put a value on what we will lose’: Rising seas could devastate historical sites across the Mediterranean, study finds

Chinese tourists charmed by Tunisian historical heritage; Xinhua

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Eid getaways: Pack your bags for a world adventure; Bindu Rai & Dona Cherian; Gulf News

From spotting gorillas in the mist to lounging on the beaches of Zanzibar tabloid has your travel for the long weekend covered

Source: Eid getaways: Pack your bags for a world adventure

Why Tunis should be your next city break; Monica Price; Metro

Medina in the historic heart of Tunis
Tunisia – Medina of Tunis

Tunisia beckons us to visit – and with flights now operating from the UK for the first time since the 2015 – they are welcoming us with open arms.

A short two and a half hour flight with no time change at the moment (thanks to BST) sees you arrive at Tunis Carthage International Airport to the sun and warmth of this beautiful country.

However, even the sun cannot outshine the warmth of the people.

I was a little apprehensive about travelling here but from the moment you arrive, the genuine smiles of the Tunisians embrace you and make you feel instantly safe and secure.

French, Arabic and English are the spoken languages, and even if their English isn’t good, they are desperate to learn and will try hard to speak it.

This trip was all about the capital Tunis, a bustling and vibrant city with over 2 million residents.

You’d be forgiven for thinking you have arrived in Paris due to the influence of French culture.

A former French colony until 1956, the architecture makes you believe you are strolling down the Avenue des Champs-Élysées when in fact you are on the main Avenue Habib Bourguiba.

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What streets look like in 30 cities around the world; Lia Ryerson; This Is Insider

Tunisia – Medina of Sousse

“There’s no place like home,” Dorothy said in “The Wizard of Oz,” and the phrase became an instant classic.

While nothing quite beats the feeling of coming home after a long day, every so often we find ourselves being overtaken by wanderlust. We’ll catch a glimpse of an intriguing street while watching a foreign film, or fall in love with a particularly descriptive passage in a book, and before we know it we’re researching late into the night, gazing at photos of far-off places and imagining what life is like in distant cities.

Luckily, these days you can check out what other parts of the world look like from the comfort of your home. We’ve compiled a list of 30 of the most stunning streets all around the world.

Keep scrolling to see how different streets can look in cities across the globe.

Marrakech, Morocco

Marrakech is a vibrant city awash in color. Take a stroll through the Medina, a walled medieval center full of tourist-friendly souvenirs, flavorful food, and friendly locals.

Havana, Cuba

Source: What streets look like in 30 cities around the world

Why everyone should be going to Tunisia this year; Nick Redmayne; Independent

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Tunisia – Dougga / Thugga

After terrorist attacks scared away the sun lounger crowd, visitors to Tunisia are now rediscovering its rich Roman history.

“Carthago delenda est” – or, “Carthage must be destroyed” – was a favourite phrase of Roman orator Cato the Elder. It took until 146BC and an emphatic victory in the Third Punic War for his punchline to be delivered. Rome’s vengeful legions levelled the city and sold its population into slavery.

Today, Tunisia is again reeling in the wake of violence, namely 2015’s two terrorist outrages, in the Bardo Museum and on the beach at Sousse. In a country where tourism was focused almost exclusively in coastal resorts, the attack was well targeted, and has decimated the tourist industry. Cheap, all-inclusive beach holidays aren’t a unique selling point; holidaymakers have fled elsewhere. Recent revisions in Foreign Office advice have changed things – Tui has, this month, put Tunisia back on its books for 2018 – but whether sun-and-sand tourists will return in their former numbers remains to be seen.

Source: Why everyone should be going to Tunisia this year