Fifth phase of restoration work at World Heritage site of Qalhat over; MenaFN

The fifth phase of restoration work at the ancient city of Qalhat, that was inscribed on the Unesco World…

Source: Oman- Fifth phase of restoration work at World Heritage site of Qalhat over

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Fifth phase of restoration work at World Heritage site of Qalhat over; Muscat Daily

The fifth phase of restoration work at the ancient city of Qalhat, that was inscribed on the Unesco World Heritage List in 2018, has been completed.

Source: Fifth phase of restoration work at World Heritage site of Qalhat over – Oman

10 incredible UNESCO World Heritage Sites every photographer should visit; Jamie Carter; Digital Photography

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Why Muscat Is The Middle East’s Most Alluring City Right Now; Gianluca Longo; Vogue

Prepare to be stunned by the distinct Omani architecture as you stroll along the promenade by Gulf of Oman and linger over tea at street cafés…

Source: Why Muscat Is The Middle East’s Most Alluring City Right Now

Tales of Bahla Fort Oman and abandoned village of Al Hamra in Oman; Lakshmi Sharath

Tales of djinns, haunted fort and abandoned village – Bahla Fort and Al Hamra in Oman

Source: Tales of Bahla Fort Oman and abandoned village of Al Hamra in Oman

Al Aqar an oasis of traditional architecture; Oman Observer

The Wilayat of Bahla in the Governorate of Al Dakhiliyah is one of the most famous tourist and heritage destinations in the Sultanate. It is noted for its…

Source: Al Aqar an oasis of traditional architecture

Top places to visit in Oman; Noel; Travel Photo Discovery

Top places to visit in Oman – key attractions, Unesco and historic sites and places of interest to visit in this historic city…

Source: Top places to visit in Oman

Oman’s new Unesco World Heritage Site: Qalhat, a ruined medieval port city where only one building from its ancient past still stands; Jamie Carter; SCMP

Source: Oman’s new Unesco World Heritage Site: Qalhat, a ruined medieval port city where only one building from its ancient past still stands

Arabian adventure in Oman: Learning on Location in a Sultanate; Linda Pappas Funsch; Frederick News Post

Editor’s Note: This is part 2 of a 2-part series profiling Oman. Part 1 was published in last week’s Real Life section.

Source: Arabian adventure in Oman: Learning on Location in a Sultanate (Part 2)

Five UNESCO World Heritage Sites that need to be seen In Oman; Ashish Batra; World Architecture

World Architecture Community News – Five UNESCO World Heritage Sites that need to be seen In Oman…

Source: Five UNESCO World Heritage Sites that need to be seen In Oman

Tourism celebrates culture and heritage; Lakshmi Kothaneth; Oman Observer

The tourism sector is one of the growing industries that has a promising future in contributing to the national GDP as well as create job opportunities.

Source: Tourism celebrates culture and heritage

Oman joins Saudi Arabia for having maximum number of Unesco World Heritage Sites – Oman; Muscat Daily

Muscat : With the inclusion of Oman’s ancient city of Qalhat to Unesco’s World Heritage List, at Unesco’s 42nd session of the World Heritage Committee meeting in Bahrain, (June 24-July 4, 2018), sultanate joins Saudi Arabia as the GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council), leader with five heritage sites each.

Source: Oman joins Saudi Arabia for having maximum number of Unesco World Heritage Sites – Oman

Gift of history; Oman Observer

What lie interred in the tomb of Bibi Maryam are never-dying memories of a splendid era… of kings and queens, of global trade, of thriving culture and…

Source: Gift of history

19 sites added to UN World Heritage List; GDN Online

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Sites from Saudi, Oman & India among others are inscribed on the list following deliberations that took place in Bahrain.

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Why Qalhat becomes part of UNESCO World Heritage; Zainab Al Nasseri; Oman Observer

Muscat: News of the entry of the City of Qalhat history through its inclusion in the list of UNESCO world heritage has gone viral on local and…

Source: Why Qalhat becomes part of UNESCO World Heritage

Qalhat declared as World Heritage Site; Yeru Ebuen; Oman Observer

Unesco has officially declared the ancient City of Qalhat as a World Heritage Site. The announcement was made on the organisation’s Twitter account on…

Source: Qalhat declared as World Heritage Site

Omani Falaj systems Attracting tourists, scientists and the UNESCO; YAHYA ALSALMANI & TITASH CHAKRABORTY; Oman Observer

Oman – Aflaj Irrigation Systems of Oman

Falaj Al Khatmayn, located in Birkat Al Mawz in the Wilayat of Nizwa attracts the attention of tourists from all around the globe. In 2006, after the World Heritage Committee of UNESCO classified this site along with four other Omani Falaj systems in the World Heritage list, Falaj Al Khatmayn gained significant popularity amongst tourists from abroad and within the country.

Since the announcement of this inclusion, tourists have gained a keen interest and sought better understanding of this unique irrigation system which has been part of Oman and its people for over 2000 years. As the oldest irrigation system and the key to this arid regions agricultural advancement, to this day many regions still depend on these falaj systems as their main source of drinking, cooking and irrigation water.

UNESCO recognised the ancient intricate structures of the water canals that formed the falaj.

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Salalah tourism thrives despite war across the border; Megan O’Toole & Wojtek Arciszewski; Al Jazeera

Oman – Land of Frankincense

Competition for tourist dollars has increased in the Omani oasis, where regional tensions seem far away.

Salalah, Oman – Tourists crowd atop a rocky outcrop overlooking the aqua seascape of Taqah, smiling as their Omani guide snaps a photo.

Down the coastal road towards Salalah, visitors pause by a row of tropical fruit stands to snack on fresh bananas and sip coconut water.

In this desert paradise, regional tensions seem to drift away. War is raging across the border in neighbouring Yemen, and Oman’s fellow Gulf Cooperation Council members are locked in an unprecedented diplomatic crisis – but on a recent afternoon, visitors to Salalah were simply enjoying the sunshine and stunning scenery.

“Oman is one of the safest places in the world,” said German tourist Thomas Fink. “I wasn’t worried at all about coming here.”

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Wabar in Dhofar contains artefacts dating back to Neolithic and Iron Age; ONA

Oman – Land of Frankincense

Wabar is one of the most important heritage sites in the Governorate of Dhofar.

The site was listed on UNESCO’s World Cultural and Natural Heritage list in 2000 in the Governorate of Dhofar, under the name of Frankincense Land Sites, with Al Baleed Park archaeological, Samahram Archaeological Park and Frankincense Sanctuary in Wadi Dokka.

During 1992-1995, the Sultanate, in cooperation with the University of South Missouri, explored this historic site on top of a limestone hill.

Although archaeologists discovered small sites scattered in the area dating back to the Stone Age (5000-4000 BCE), settlement events in the region was there during the Iron Age (325 BC – 625 AD), where some pottery and frankincense tools were found in the castle. They belong to the first century BC to the middle of the Islamic era.

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Ancient Oman featured in new University of Pennsylvania book; Mohammed Al Balushi; Times of Oman

 

Oman – Archaeological Sites of Bat, Al-Khutm and Al-Ayn

Muscat: Residents of Oman and researchers who wish to know more about the ancient history of the Sultanate will now be able to do so easily thanks to a new book released by the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.

Published in collaboration with Oman’s Ministry of Heritage and Culture (MoHC) last Sunday, ‘The Bronze Age Towers of Bat’ is a 360-page book that narrates and showcases the deep, ancient history of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Bat, a Bronze Age settlement that was founded in the year 3000 BC and is located in Wilayat Ibri in the Dhahira Governorate.

Edited by Christopher P. Thornton, Charlotte M. Cable, and Gregory L. Possehl, the book was published after UPenn conducted excavations at the site between 2007 and 2012.

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