Project digs into ancient agricultural practices in Umm Al Rassas; Saeb Rawashdeh; Jordan Times

Umm Al Rassas is a UNESCO World Heritage site, located about 75 kilometres south of Amman, famous for its 16 Byzantine churches. In the late third century AD, the place was known under the name Kastron Mefaa, being the military camp of a cavalry unit, which protected the neighbouring villages from bedouin raids. Due to population growth in the fifth and sixth centuries, the place became the civilian, double-walled town of Mefaa.

Source: Project digs into ancient agricultural practices in Umm Al Rassas

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Babylon added to UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites; CNN

It was a metropolis in ancient Mesopotamia that became one of the most important sites in the ancient world. Now Babylon, in Iraq, is officially a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Source: Babylon added to UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites

Go around the world in 80 days as part of Airbnb’s new adventures; Andrea Smith; Lonely Planet

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The Nabataeans–An Early, Pre-Islamic Arab Kingdom Once Lost in Time; John Mason; Arab America

Long before the rise of Islam in the 7th century AD, an Arab power arose in the 4th century BC. Known as the Nabataean Kingdom, is formed from an Arab, Bedouin tribal base, much as the Islamic empire did almost a millennium later. In time, the Kingdom became a client state of the Roman Empire and thereafter declined in importance to the point where it almost disappeared from the map. It became so hidden in its geographic and economic isolation that it was virtually forgotten, becoming home to just…

Source: The Nabataeans–An Early, Pre-Islamic Arab Kingdom Once Lost in Time

Middle East: an overview of UNESCO World Heritage Sites; KAWA

The Al-Hijr site in Saudi Arabia As an ancient city carved out of sandstone, Al-Hijr extends over an area of 15 km² in northwest Saudi Arabia. This is a magnificent site, left as a legacy by the Nabataean civilization, with a multitude of tombs, wells and monuments richly decorated. As you walk through them, you …

Source: Middle East: an overview of UNESCO World Heritage Sites – KAWA

A Guide to Petra: One of New Seven Wonders of the World; Team Out Of Town; Out of Town Blog

The Ultimate first-timer’s travel guide to Petra, Jordan

Source: A Guide to Petra: One of New Seven Wonders of the World – Out of Town Blog

Petra, a desert dream; Tom Stieghorst; Travel Weekly

Glimpsing the Treasury building at the end of mile-long hike down a narrow slot canyon — bright in the sun against the shadow of the cliff walls — has something of the quality of a mirage.

Source: Petra, a desert dream: Travel Weekly

In the Crosshairs: Ancient Rock Art Under Fire; Lisa Mol, Charlotte Brassey, Lucy Clarke, Kaelin Groom & Rachel King; Eos

Jordan’s petroglyphs are riddled with bullet holes from historic target practice and battles. A multidisciplinary forensics team went to Wadi Rum to assess the damage.

Source: In the Crosshairs: Ancient Rock Art Under Fire – Eos

Get lost in the historical beauty of Petra, Jordan; Jennifer Cox; Suburban

Petra, also known as the “Red Rose City,” is undoubtedly Jordan’s most popular tourist site. A stunning historical marvel built into the face of red rocks more than 2000 years…

Source: Get lost in the historical beauty of Petra, Jordan

Jordan Travel: 5 Adventures You Can’t Miss; Morgan Tilton; GearJunkie

Jordan is booming with adventure, indoors and out. From Petra to Wadi Rum, this guide outlines bike tours, ancient archaeological visits, and nights under the stars.

Source: Jordan Travel: 5 Adventures You Can’t Miss | GearJunkie

Let Disney’s new movie releases inspire your next travel adventure; Sasha Brady; Lonely Planet

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Petra – One of the 7 New Wonders of the World; Novinite.com – Sofia News Agency

One of the seven new wonders of the world, the city of secrets, Petra, has become particularly popular since the release of one of Indiana Jones’ series and has since attracted millions of tourists from around the world. Petra (Arabic: البتراء, Al-Batrāʾ; Ancient Greek: Πέτρα), originally known to the Nabataeans as Raqmu, is a historical and archaeological city in southern Jordan.

Source: Petra – One of the 7 New Wonders of the World – Novinite.com – Sofia News Agency

The Stunning Greek-inspired Architecture of the Ancient City of Petra; Kerry Kolasa-Sikiaridi; Greek Reporter

The ancient ruins of Petra, Jordan, highlight the pervasive influence of Greek architecture in ancient times. Here is what you have in store when you visit the archaeological site…

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Petra 101: Everything You Need to Know About the Ancient Rose City; Teddy Minford; Fodors

Petra is one of the Seven Wonders of the World and one of the best things to do in Jordan. Our complete guide has everything you need to know about when to visit, where to stay, and what to see at this ancient archaeological site in the Middle East. From souvenirs to food and drinks, we’ve highlighted the best places to eat, stay, and shop while visiting this UNESCO World Heritage site.

Source: Petra 101: Everything You Need to Know About the Ancient Rose City

Desert hiking in Jordan: explore Bedouin trails, climb Wadi Rum and have some unforgettable nights under the stars; Paul Niel; SCMP

Source: Desert hiking in Jordan: explore Bedouin trails, climb Wadi Rum and have some unforgettable nights under the stars

Must-Do Activities in Jordan; Marriott TRAVELER

Find things to do around Jordan for your trip to the Middle East. From floating in the Red Sea to exploring ancient historical sites, don’t miss these must-do’s.

Source: Must-Do Activities in Jordan | Marriott TRAVELER

Discover mystery among the ruins in Petra; Mira Temkin; Splash Magazine

Jordan – Petra

Petra, Jordan has often been called “The Red City,” or the “The Lost City of Stone,” or known for its famous backdrop in the movie, “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.” Located in the southwestern…

Read more from source: Discover mystery among the ruins in Petra

Saying goodbye to Stephen Hawking; Ayleen Barbel Fattal; FIU News

Jordan – Wadi Rum Protected Area

FIU mathematics professor Ada Monserrat frequently travels on semester breaks pursuing unique experiences. Previous trips have taken Monserrat on visits to all parts of the world. She has visited CERN in Geneva, home of the Large Hadron Collider where the Higgs-Boson particle was discovered. She has explored the history of flight and space exploration at the Memorial Museum of Cosmonautics in Moscow. She has been to Madame Marie Curie’s home in Poland and Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building. She has traveled to Jerusalem to meet Anne Frank’s best friend. This year, she explored the ruins of Genbaku Dome in Hiroshima, one of the few buildings left standing near ground zero of the 1945 atomic bomb.

But perhaps one of her most memorable journeys was in 2014 when she traveled to the University of Cambridge for a one-on-one meeting with acclaimed physicist Stephen Hawking. When Monserrat learned of his passing this year, she was in the Middle East. After having spent a few days in the city of Petra in Jordan’s southwestern desert, Monserrat cut her trip short to travel to Cambridge and pay her respects.

Read more from source: Saying goodbye to Stephen Hawking

Clearing Land Mines From the Spot Where Jesus Is Said to Have Been Baptized; Isabel Kershner; NY Times

Jordan – Baptism Site “Bethany Beyond the Jordan” (Al-Maghtas)

One by one, the pilgrims plunged under the cool, khaki-toned waters of the Jordan River, wading in from the Israeli-controlled western bank to rededicate their faith at the spot where John the Baptist is believed to have baptized Jesus.

The river here is narrow and lazy, lined with vivid green bulrushes and dotted with palm trees.

“It was freezing cold!” exclaimed Laura Ng, 58, a member of a Christian Bible study group from Singapore, as she emerged from the murky water in a purple T-shirt. “But when I got immersed, I felt cleansed all over.”

On the opposite bank, a few gentle swim strokes away, a smaller group of tourists stood on the Jordanian side and took photos on their cellphones.

In the days before Easter, Holy Land tour groups were arriving by the busload at the Israeli-run baptism site known as Qasr al-Yahud. Arabic for “the Castle of the Jews,” the name is said to be a reference to the castle-like appearance of a nearby Greek Orthodox monastery and to Jewish belief, which holds that this is where Joshua led the Israelites into the Promised Land.

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7 reasons why Jordan should be on your bucket list; Gracie Stewart; Buro 247

Jordan – Wadi Rum Protected Area

You’re in for a surprising adventure of a lifetime

Jordan is a country that often suffers guilt by association due to its location in the Middle East. But safe and hospitable, visitors who take the time to discover this beautiful country are rewarded with stunning natural landscapes and world-renowned historical and religious sites. Here are seven reasons why you should visit this hidden gem of the Middle East.

1. FLOAT IN THE DEAD SEA

Located in the Jordan Rift Valley, bordered by Israel to the East and Jordan to the West, the Dead Sea is actually a lake, and a very salty one at that. The Dead Sea’s extreme saltiness means that once you wade in, your body instantly bobs to the surface — leaving you free to lie back, relax, and enjoy a soak at the lowest point on Earth. After your swim, you can slather yourself in Dead Sea mud, which has proven healing properties, due to its high concentration of salts and minerals.

2. VISIT PETRA, AN ANCIENT METROPOLIS

Source: 7 reasons why Jordan should be on your bucket list