Category: Algeria

Rising Seas Threaten Algeria’s Ancient Melting Pot; Gemma Tarlach; Undark

Photo: Hana Aouak

For more than a millennium, Tipasa was a symbol of cultural exchange. Now it’s in the crosshairs of climate change.

Source: Rising Seas Threaten Algeria’s Ancient Melting Pot

Climate change is expected to hit heritage sites across Africa; Doug Johnson; Ars Technica

Photo: Ethel Davies

Research sheds light on the future of floods at culturally important sites.

Source: Climate change is expected to hit heritage sites across Africa

Rising sea levels may threaten 70% of Africa’s heritage sites by 2050; MenaFN

Photo: MenaFN

Source: Rising sea levels may threaten 70% of Africa’s heritage site…

African World Heritage Sites Jeopardized by Rising Seas; Jenessa Duncombe; Eos

Photo: Hana Aouak

Worsening flooding and erosion threaten places of “outstanding universal value” along the continent’s coastlines.

Source: African World Heritage Sites Jeopardized by Rising Seas – Eos

Algeria’s Ancient Melting Pot Faces an Uncertain Future; Gemma Tarlach; Atlas Obscura

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For more than a millennium, Tipasa was a symbol of cross-cultural exchange. Now the sea is coming for it.

Source: Algeria’s Ancient Melting Pot Faces an Uncertain Future

Improving the connection between heritage and young people in archaeological sites in Djémila (Algeria); Unesco

Photo: Hamdi Bendali

Source: Improving the connection between heritage and young people in archaeological sites in Djémila (Algeria)

10 Extra-Special UNESCO World Heritage Sites; Pat Tompkins; AFAR

Photo: Imagebroker.com

Hierapolis-Pamukkale in Turkey and Ibiza, Spain are just two of 10 incredible UNESCO World Heritage Sites that blend culture and nature.

Source: 10 Extra-Special UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Residents of Africa’s five ancient cities protect and their traditional way of life; The Frontier Post

Photo: Frontier Post

Monitoring Desk In Africa’s largest nation, residents of five ancient cities are going to great lengths to protect and preserve their traditional way of life. Algeria is 10 times the size of the UK Stretching between Morocco and Tunisia and facing Europe across the Mediterranean, Algeria is Africa’s largest nation and the 10th largest in the world.

Source: Residents of Africa’s five ancient cities protect and their traditional way of life – The Frontier Post

This Is Why Africa’s Roman Ghost City Was Left To Sink Into The Saharan Sands For 1000 Years; Suzi Marsh; Scribol

Why was the Roman city of Timgad left to become a ghost town on the edge of the Sahara desert? On the fringes of the Sahara desert, a mass of sprawling ruins stand stark against the parched landscape. Many centuries ago this was a bustling Roman metropolis, one of the empire’s last outposts in the south.

Source: This Is Why Africa’s Roman Ghost City Was Left To Sink Into The Saharan Sands For 1000 Years

Explore the Ruins of Timgad, the “African Pompeii” Excavated from the Sands of Algeria; Colin Marshall; Open Culture

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Algeria named 2020’s best country for backpacking; Jakarta Post


With its wide range of attractions and small number of tourists, BSS believes that Algeria packs the most thrills for a backpacking adventure.

Source: Algeria named 2020’s best country for backpacking

Revisited – The Kasbah of Algiers, a symbol of Algeria; Miyuki Droz; France 24

Source: Revisited – The Kasbah of Algiers, a symbol of Algeria

Cultural capital: the ongoing regeneration of Algiers’ Casbah; Stephen Zacks; Architectural Review

A sense of promise hangs in the air over Algiers, accompanied by renewed interest in the fate of the Casbah, but its proposed regeneration is cause for concern…

Source: Cultural capital: the ongoing regeneration of Algiers’ Casbah

The Sahara buried this ancient Roman city—preserving it for centuries; Ruben Montoya; National Geographic

Once a thriving North African military outpost, Thamugadi was forgotten under desert sands, until a Scottish explorer went looking for it centuries later.

Source: The Sahara buried this ancient Roman city—preserving it for centuries

The best areas to stay in Algiers; Antoine de Cherade; Traveltipy

Are you heading to Algiers, Algeria’s “white city”? Find out where are the best neighborhoods to stay in Algiers!

Source: The best areas to stay in Algiers

A New Chapter in the Effort to Preserve Ancient Mosaics in the Mediterranean; Joan Weinstein; The Iris

Flexibility in a funding initiative for mosaics conservators leads to a range of positive outcomes…

Source: A New Chapter in the Effort to Preserve Ancient Mosaics in the Mediterranean

Overpopulation and neglect threatens iconic Algiers Casbah; Hiba Morgan; Al Jazeera

It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but why is the future of Algeria’s famous Casbah not looking so rosy?

Source: Overpopulation and neglect threatens iconic Algiers Casbah

10 Incredible People With Incredibly Unfortunate Names; Mark Oliver; Listverse

Algeria – Kasbah of Algiers

When you’re cursed with a humiliating name, it can feel like there’s no way to outlive it—like you could change the course of history and still only be remembered as the guy whose parents named him “Dick Small.” It’s a pain known too well by every little boy named Willie and every substitute teacher who’s had to tell her class that her name is “Mrs. Cockswell.”

Some people, though, didn’t let that stop them. They went out into the world and did incredible things—the types of things we’d learn about in every history class if we could only get through a unit without middle schoolers giggling at every mention of “Bushrod Johnson” or “Emperor Pupienus.”

10 Dick Bong

America’s Greatest Flying Ace

He’s been called the “Ace of Aces,” “the bravest of the brave,” and “America’s greatest World War II pilot.” But to those who knew him, he was just Dick Bong.

Dick Bong shot down more enemy planes than any other American pilot.

Read more from source: 10 Incredible People With Incredibly Unfortunate Names – Listverse

International Expert Meeting on the Conservation and Revitalization of the Kasbah of Algiers, a World Heritage property; Unesco

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Algeria – Kasbah of Algiers

The World Heritage Centre and the Ministry of Culture of Algeria will organize from 20 to 24 January 2018 in Algiers an International Expert Meeting on the Conservation and Revitalisation of the Kasbah of Algiers, a World Heritage property, which was inscribed on the World Heritage List in 1982.

The meeting aims to address key issues related to the conservation and management of the site in order to propose an integrated and coordinated approach to the revitalization of the Kasbah. It will take stock of international case studies presenting issues similar to those of the Kasbah of Algiers in order to build on different processes of conservation and revitalization of historic urban centers. An inaugural cultural event is scheduled on 20 January 2017, with the theme “The Kasbah of Algiers in contemporary Algerian history through literature, painting and music”.

This meeting is part of UNESCO’s contribution to the implementation of the UN 2030 Agenda for SDG 11 on sustainable cities and communities, and its target 4 on strengthening efforts to protect and preserve the world’s cultural and natural heritage.

Source: International Expert Meeting on the Conservation and Revitalization of the Kasbah of Algiers, a World Heritage property

Travel year in review: our writers’ highlights of 2017; Rosemary Behan; The National

Algeria – Djémila

Family adventures or solo trips, budget stays or the ultimate in luxury, a look back through our travel calendars always seems to confirm time well-used. These were some of our favourite experiences on the road.

My 2017 has been more office-bound than usual, but the highlight was probably the second week of January, when I arrived on Necker Island in the British Virgin Islands. Owned by Sir Richard Branson and rented out under the Virgin Limited Edition brand, the far-flung island had long been on my list to visit, and the launch of a new direct Emirates service to Fort Lauderdale in Florida, as well as its code-share agreement with JetBlue, put it within striking distance. Both its physical attributes – a small, lightly developed private island with regenerating fresh air and translucent aquamarine water – and its place in the Richard Branson story made it a once-in-a-lifetime trip.

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