Old Town Lunenburg

 Canada
Nova Scotia
N44 22 34 W64 18 33
Date of Inscription: 1995
Criteria: (iv)(v)
Property : 33.85 ha
Buffer zone: 32.44 ha
Ref: 741
News Link/Travelogue: CANADA; 

Lunenburg is the best surviving example of a planned British colonial settlement in North America. Established in 1753, it has retained its original layout and overall appearance, based on a rectangular grid pattern drawn up in the home country. The inhabitants have managed to safeguard the city’s identity throughout the centuries by preserving the wooden architecture of the houses, some of which date from the 18th century.

Brief synthesisOld Town Lunenburg is the best surviving example of a planned British colonial settlement in North America. Established in 1753, it has retained its original layout and overall appearance, based on a rectangular grid pattern drawn up in the home country. The inhabitants have safeguarded the town’s identity throughout the centuries by preserving the wooden architecture of the houses and public buildings, some of which date from the 18th century and constitute an excellent example of a sustained vernacular architectural tradition. Its economic basis has traditionally been the offshore Atlantic fishery, the future of which is highly questionable at the present time.

Criterion (iv): Old Town Lunenburg is a well-preserved example of 18th century British colonial urban planning, which has undergone no significant changes since its foundation, and which largely continues to fulfil the economic and social purposes for which it was designed. Of special importance is its diversified and well-preserved vernacular architectural tradition, which spans over 250 years.

Criterion (v): Old Town Lunenburg is an excellent example of an urban community and culture designed for and based on the offshore Atlantic fishery which is undergoing irreversible change and is evolving in a form that cannot yet be fully defined.

Suggested Base:

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5 replies »

  1. The town itself is an impressive place to see. Make sure to stroll down the harbour, see the impressive Lunenburg Academy and explore the Bluenose II. It really is a historic place you must visit.

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  2. The rainbow colours of the 18th and 19th century buildings, well-preserved British architecture and horse-drawn carriages give this waterfront community its distinct historical character. It’s a tourist destination, no doubt, but maintains its traditional feel.

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  3. It feels like waking around a town made up of doll houses. There were charming and breathtaking views everywhere, whether it was the architecture or the great views of the water.

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  4. Take a sailing cruise, hire bikes to tour the beaches of the peninsula, hop in a horse carriage to tour the town or just wander around the antique streets to see what you’ll find.

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  5. Everywhere I look there are beautifully preserved buildings painted in a jellybean jar of colours: purple, orange, yellow and pink. Most are now inns, restaurants, shops and galleries. The architecture is captivating and the buildings are arranged according to the original town plan.

    Like

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