Town of Bamberg

District of Upper Franconia
N49 53 30 E10 53 20
Date of Inscription: 1993
Criteria: (ii)(iv)
Property : 142 ha
Buffer zone: 444 ha
Ref: 624
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From the 10th century onwards, this town became an important link with the Slav peoples, especially those of Poland and Pomerania. During its period of greatest prosperity, from the 12th century onwards, the architecture of Bamberg strongly influenced northern Germany and Hungary. In the late 18th century it was the centre of the Enlightenment in southern Germany, with eminent philosophers and writers such as Hegel and Hoffmann living there.

Bamberg is located in southern Germany in the north of Bavaria. It is a good example of a central European town with a basically early medieval plan and many surviving ecclesiastical and secular buildings of the medieval period. When Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, became King of Germany in 1007 he made Bamberg the seat of a bishopric, intended to become a ‘second Rome’. Of particular interest is the way in which the present town illustrates the link between agriculture (market gardens and vineyards) and the urban distribution centre.

From the 10th century onwards, Bamberg became an important link with the Slav peoples, especially those of Poland and Pomerania. During its period of greatest prosperity, from the 12th century onwards, the architecture of this town strongly influenced northern Germany and Hungary. In the late 18th century Bamberg was the centre of the Enlightenment in southern Germany, with eminent philosophers and writers such as Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and E.T.A. Hoffmann living there.

Criterion (ii): The layout and architecture of medieval and baroque Bamberg exerted a strong influence on urban form and evolution in the lands of central Europe from the 11th century onwards.

Criterion (iv): Bamberg is an outstanding and representative example of an early medieval town in central Europe, both in its plan and its surviving ecclesiastical and secular buildings.

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Nuremberg (German: Nürnberg) is Franconia’s largest city, and its undisputed economic, social and cultural centre. The city lies on the Pegnitz River and the Main-Danube Canal. Within the city limits Nuremberg has a population of about 520,000 (2018), making it the second-biggest city in the Bundesland Bavaria and the biggest city in the region of Franconia. Greater Nuremberg including its suburbs has a population of 1.3 million. The Metropolitan Region Nuremberg which extends to cities like Bamberg or Ansbach has a population of 3.5 million. Long a de facto independent “freie Reichstadt”, the city was an early centre of manufacturing and proto-industry and had a golden era during the 16th century when people like Albrecht Dürer, Hans Sachs or Martin Behaim called the city home. Annexed into Bavaria in the early 19th century, the city later came to host Germany’s first railway, linking it with neighbouring Fürth (this railway has since been replaced first by a tram and then by a subway line; the current route to Fürth follows a different alignment) [read more].

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1 reply »

  1. It’s a great place to get lost. Meander down narrow uneven cobblestone alleyways and around the next corner you might find an elderly man playing the accordion or girls from the nearby music school playing flutes with a hat at their feet for donations–a new version of the lemonade stand. Antique collectors could spend the day exploring tiny shops crammed with mannequin heads, old steamer trunks, metal toys and lederhosen.

    Like

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