Jaipur City, Rajasthan

 India
N26 55 27.4 E75 49 18.7
Date of Inscription: 2019
Criteria: (ii)(iv)(vi)
Property : 710 ha
Buffer zone: 2,205 ha
Ref: 1605
News Links/Travelogues:

The walled city of Jaipur, in India’s north-western state of Rajasthan was founded in 1727 by Sawai Jai Singh II. Unlike other cities in the region located in hilly terrain, Jaipur was established on the plain and built according to a grid plan interpreted in the light of Vedic architecture. The streets feature continuous colonnaded businesses that intersect in the centre, creating large public squares called chaupars. Markets, shops, residences and temples built along the main streets have uniform facades. The city’s urban planning shows an exchange of ideas from ancient Hindu and early modern Mughal as well as Western cultures. The grid plan is a model that prevails in the West, while the organization of the different city sectors (chowkris) refers to traditional Hindu concepts. Designed to be a commercial capital, the city has maintained its local commercial, artisanal and cooperative traditions to this day.

Suggested Bases:

Jaipur, also known as the Pink City, is the capital of Indian state of Rajasthan, and its largest city. The city was built in the 18th century by Sawai Jai Singh as India’s first planned city, and today it’s a major tourist attraction for Indians and for international visitors. It is a very picturesque city with splendid palaces, forts and historical monuments and belongs to the tourist Golden Triangle along with Delhi and Agra. It hosts several attractions including the City Palace, Govind Dev ji Temple, Vidhan Sabha, Birla Temple and several massive Rajput forts. It also serves as a stepping stone for those heading to the desert cities of Jodhpur and Jaisalmer. Jaipur is growing fast and various development projects are being undertaken by the government and private enterprises. Jaipur’s nickname, the Pink City, is due to its distinctly coloured buildings, which were painted this colour to imitate the red sandstone architecture of Mughal cities [read more].

Sikar is a city located midway between Agra and Bikaner on the National Highway 52 in the state of Rajasthan in India. It is the administrative headquarters of the Sikar District. Sikar is a historical city and contains many old havelis (large houses with Mughal-era architecture). It is located 114 km from Jaipur, 320 km from Jodhpur 215 km from Bikaner, and 280 km from Delhi. Sikar had been the biggest Thikana (Estate) of the Jaipur state. Previously Sikar was known as shekhawati. It was the capital town of Thikana Sikar. Sikar is surrounded by the fortified walls consisting of seven “Pols” (gates). These historic gates are named as Bawari gate, Fatehpuri Gate, Nani Gate, Surajpole Gate, Dujod Gate Old, Dujod Gate New and Chandpole Gate. The primitive name of Sikar was “Beer BhanKa Bass”. Sikar is the district headquarters of Rajasthan’s Sikar district, which is situated in the eastern part of Rajasthan [read more].

Kota is in the Hadoti region of Rajasthan. It is located on the south-eastern side of the state. The Chambal river flows through the town, because of which the place is unlike the arid climate prevalent in the state. Moving around within the city is limited to auto-rickshaws, privately operated buses and cycle-rickshaws for short journeys. They charge anywhere from 50 Paise/Km. to ₹4/Km., but it’s advisable to fix the rates before taking a seat. Kota also has a larger three wheeler called tempo, which is by far the cheapest travel mode within the city. It is a shared vehicle with pre-fixed stops and fares, generally .50 Paise/Km. See Aalnia Dam. (25 km) An archeological area with ancient Indian stone carvings. Chambal Garden. This garden stretches along the banks of the river Chambal. It houses a pond with rare gharial and crocodiles, which can be crossed via a teetering suspension bridge. It also has enclosures for birds, rabbits and such [read more].

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.