America’s grand buildings constructed by slaves – ​Monticello; Reuters

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Monticello, the expansive brick home of Thomas Jefferson, sits atop a hill overlooking farmland, trees and the University of Virginia, the institution founded by the third US president.Its distinctive architecture – a columned portico, balconies ringing the upper floors, the famous dome – has landed the residence on the UNESCO World Heritage Site list and the back of the US nickel.Built between 1769 and 1809, Monticello is also one of the most famous of the hundreds of landmark American buildings constructed by slaves. Four hundred years ago this month, the boat carrying what is believed to…

Source: America’s grand buildings constructed by slaves – ​Monticello

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How Jefferson Lost Some Luster in His Own Hometown; Fred Lucas; Daily Signal

Charlottesville has been defined by Thomas Jefferson’s legacy, but the third president is now a target in the city’s conflict with history.

Source: How Jefferson Lost Some Luster in His Own Hometown

It’s the Top 10 Again for UVA in New Money Magazine Ranking; Jane Kelly; UVA Today

Money ranked UVA the 10th-best-value school for the third year in a row, and No. 7 in the magazine’s ranking of public universities. UVA is the only public university in Money’s top 10 to meet 100% of students’ demonstrated financial need.

Source: It’s the Top 10 Again for UVA in New Money Magazine Ranking

Portella Contributes to Monticello Project; Glass On Web

Monticello is Thomas Jefferson’s estate, preserved now as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, it serves as a museum, place of study and research, and a historical site.

Source: Portella Contributes to Monticello Project

A University Makes Its Historic Campus More Welcoming to Everyone; Lawrence Biemiller; Chronicle of Higher Education

Making UVa’s famous Lawn accessible was a challenge on several levels. And more news on campus spaces.

Source: A University Makes Its Historic Campus More Welcoming to Everyone

The University should provide an ADA accessible Lawn room; Olivia Burke; Cavalier Daily

We as a community must press on toward complete inclusivity by showing overwhelming student and faculty support for an ADA accessible Lawn room.

Source: BURKE: The University should provide an ADA accessible Lawn room

College Town Travel: Charlottesville; Jared Misner; Charlotte Magazine

It’s healing from a year—or rather a history—of division

Source: College Town Travel: Charlottesville

Exploring Charlottesville, Virginia With The Elderly; Melody Pittman & Taylor Pittman Hardy; Wherever I May Roam

Exploring Charlottesville, Virginia is a must for everyone. Travel back in time and see how life was at the homes of 3 US Presidents and Founding Fathers.

Source: Exploring Charlottesville, Virginia With The Elderly – Wherever I May Roam

Visit Monticello To Walk Through Thomas Jefferson’s Mind; Regina Cole; Forbes

The very best house museums bring together important architecture with riveting personal stories. Jostling for dominance at the top of the list is Monticello. The house is singular; walking in is like stepping into its builder’s brain.

Source: Visit Monticello To Walk Through Thomas Jefferson’s Mind

The 11 most beautiful college campuses in the US; Emese Fromm; Matador Network

It’s not Hogwarts. But almost.

Source: The 11 most beautiful college campuses in the US

The University of Virginia’s Secret ‘Seven Society’; Meg; Atlas Obscura

The story behind the mysterious “7” symbol painted in front of the famous Rotunda.

Source: The University of Virginia’s Secret ‘Seven Society’

Concerns remain over Alderman Library renovation plans; Ruth Serven; Daily Progress

USA – Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville

David Vander Meulen was raised in a house without many books.

“I didn’t grow up with any sense of what that wider world was, and then when I found out I could go to the library at my local college, I thought, ‘Wow,’” said Vander Meulen, now a professor of English and bibliography at the University of Virginia. “To deny that to others, especially other first-generation students, would be a travesty. That glimpse of the wider world.”

Vander Meulen is a bibliographer; he describes and lists various editions of books and, by tracking slight changes, edits and errors, tries to understand the thought processes of authors and editors. He needs multiple editions of books and fears that planned renovations of UVa’s Alderman Library, which will be discussed at the Board of Visitors’ meeting Thursday, will endanger or destroy those books.

“One of the great accomplishments of libraries from the late-19th century on was making libraries available to the public,” Vander Meulen said. “Many modern libraries are moving in the opposite direction by reducing access to physical books.”

Read more from source: Concerns remain over Alderman Library renovation plans

3 Days of Summer Fun in Charlottesville & Albemarle County!; Virginia’s Travel Blog

USA – Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville

The summer season is an especially beautiful and fun time to visit Charlottesville & Albemarle County! The area is home to world-renowned historic attractions, the prestigious University of Virginia, a booming craft beverage scene including wine, beer, artisanal cider, and spirits, one of the longest pedestrian malls in the entire country , all while being nestled against the backdrop of the breathtaking Blue Ridge Mountains. The hardest part of planning your trip will be trying to figure out which activities to choose, so the best bet is to extend your stay, so you can take advantage of everything. Check out this three-day itinerary that will deliver on many of the best things that the Charlottesville area has to offer!

Day 1

Your visit to Charlottesville & Albemarle County will begin by exploring some of the area’s iconic historic attractions. Home to three former presidents (Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and James Madison), this region is steeped in a history and tradition dating back to our nation’s formative years.

Read more from source: 3 Days of Summer Fun in Charlottesville & Albemarle County! – Virginia’s Travel Blog

UVA Exhibit Displayed The Architectural Mastery of America’s Founding Father; Ayla Guderhan Anakli; World Architecture

USA – Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville

Thomas Jefferson has a legendary position in the American history. He was one of the Founding Fathers, the third President of the United States and the author of the Declaration of Independence. Even though it is not the first thing that comes to mind, he was also a proven architect.

A special exhibition From the Grounds Up: Thomas Jefferson’s Architecture & Design illuminated Jefferson’s architectural vision for the United States. The exhibition took place at Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia (UVA), Charlottesville and displayed Jefferson’s drawings and prints among other archival materials. The exhibition was on view from January 26 through April 29 2018, and reflected Jefferson’s architectural achievements that still endures today.

“Architecture is my delight,” Jefferson once said and throughout his life he sketched and designed many buildings. This was the first major exhibition of drawings on Jefferson’s architecture in more than 40 years according to Richard Guy Wilson, the curator of the exhibition and architectural history professor at UVA.

Jefferson is known as a a classicist who drew upon ancient Rome and Renaissance architecture.

Read more from source: UVA Exhibit Displayed The Architectural Mastery of America’s Founding Father

25 of the Most Beautiful College Campuses In the South; Madison Alcedo; Country Living

USA – Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville

There’s just something so charming about these sprawling Southern campuses.

There’s nothing that signals the transition from summer to fall quite like watching students go back to school, when lazy summer days are given structure once again. Whether you’re an alumni reminiscing on your favorite college memories, or a parent gearing up for an empty nest, we’ve rounded up the prettiest Southern college campuses that will make you wish you were headed back to school, too.

Wake Forest University

Location: Winston Salem, NC

Wake Forest University’s most recognizable campus building is the Wait Chapel, which is named after the university’s founder Samuel Wait who started the private school in 1834.

University of Texas

Location: Austin, Texas

If you attend a University of Texas home football game, look out for the school’s mascot, a longhorn named Bevo—yes, a live longhorn actually attends the game! In 1915, when UT defeated Texas A&M 13-0, the football team changed the 13 to a B, the hyphen to an E, and added a V before the 0, to get the name Bevo.

Clemson University

Read more from source: 25 of the Most Beautiful College Campuses In the South

Smooth Traveler: African American History Month Special- Virginia’s Presidential Precinct: Albemarle County; Renee S Gordon; The Philadelphia Sunday Sun

USA – Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesvill

Virginia was the site of the first permanent English settlement in America. It is also the place where the first slaves disembarked.  Eight Virginians have been elected as President of the United States, four being among the first five presidents: Washington, Jefferson, Madison and Monroe. These factors make Virginia a microcosm of both colonial society and the American culture that flowed from it. Great care has been taken to interpret history holistically there, and… 

Source: Smooth Traveler: African American History Month Special- Virginia’s Presidential Precinct: Albemarle County – The Philadelphia Sunday Sun

Romantic getaways for any time of the year; Michelle Newman; Express News

USA – Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville

These destinations have all the right ingredients for a romantic getaway any time of year to reignite that spark and rekindle romance.

JEFFERSON ISLAND

Jefferson Island isn’t an island at all. It’s an elevated mound and a salt dome in New Iberia, Louisiana, near near Avery Island, which is famous for making Tabasco Sauce.

Think that doesn’t sound romantic? Think again. Jefferson Island is so well hidden, it’s the perfect place for a romantic rendezvous.

Many Louisiana natives don’t even know about this under-the-radar, secluded spot. But those who have visited don’t forget it.

The island is named after Joseph Jefferson, a prominent 19th century actor famous for playing Rip Van Winkle in stage productions.

The spectacular 1870 Steamboat Gothic mansion was originally used by Jefferson as a winter hunting lodge and getaway. Now the “island” is the site of the magnificent Jefferson Mansion, Rip Van Winkle Gardens, and onsite cafe serving Creole and Cajun fare. Here, guests can spend the night in an authentic Acadian cottage, “Cook’s Cottage,” and historic servant’s quarters.

Narrated tours are given of the mansion and its splendid furnishings by guides dressed in period costume.

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Historic Rotunda recognized for environmentally-friendly renovation; Tyler Kendall; Newsplex

USA – Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (CBS19 NEWS) — The University of Virginia’s Rotunda has received a Silver LEED Certification. LEED, an international review system, stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.

“LEED certification is a third-party rating system developed by the U.S. Green Building Council,” said Andrea Trimble, the sustainability director at UVA. “UVA is particularly unique in that we are really taking advantage of our historical preservation opportunities as well as our sustainability opportunities for projects.”

Along with UVA’s Pavillions 9 and 10, the Charlottesville landmarks are the only UNESCO Heritage sites in the world to achieve this recognition.

“To our knowledge, UVA has the only LEED-certified UNESCO world heritage buildings in the world and we have three of them,” said Trimble.

The Rotunda underwent significant renovation from 2012 to 2016. Officials say LEED certification was on their minds from the very start.

“This project was committed to it in the beginning from the earliest phases of design,” said Trimble. “The team knew that sustainability would be important to the project and that LEED certification would be part of the process.”

Source: Historic Rotunda recognized for environmentally-friendly renovation

Don’t Let A Bunch Of Racists And Neo-Nazis Define Charlottesville; Alan Parker; Toronto Sun

USA – Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville

I don’t need to recap the events of the past weekend, when far-right, white-supremist groups gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia, to protest the removal of Confederate monuments from public spaces in the small mountain town.

The neo-Nazis, the KKK and their friends held a torchlight rally à la Hitler’s Nuremberg propaganda rallies and, later that night and the next day, went out and beat the crap out of anti-fascist protesters, wounding dozens, before one psychotic drove his car into a crowd of pedestrians, killing one woman and injuring 19.

And, of course, you know all about President Donald Trump’s disgusting response to the events of the weekend.

So we’re not going over all that again.

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University of Virginia plans a large memorial commemorating thousands of enslaved people who worked there; Susan Svrluga; The Washington Post

USA – Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville

Two hundred years ago, Thomas Jefferson came to an abandoned farm to begin marking out the landscape for the university he planned to create, accompanied by his overseer and 10 slaves.

“From the very first moment, this is a story where there are often more enslaved people than designers, or professors, or students” at the University of Virginia, said Kirt von Daacke, a professor and assistant dean.

The bricks that built Jefferson’s vision of a place where students and professors lived and worked and learned together were dug out of clay by enslaved people, shaped by enslaved people, baked in kilns by enslaved people. The stone for the stately steps and architectural details was quarried and carved by enslaved people. And much of the building was done by enslaved people, usually “rented” from slave owners in the surrounding area.

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