7 UNESCO World Heritage Sites worth visiting this winter; Eleanor Aldridge; Afar

Among UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites, these seven locations are prime destinations to visit during the winter holidays.

Source: 7 UNESCO World Heritage Sites worth visiting this winter

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Eight incredible sights to see on a Norwegian fjords cruise; Jeannine Williamson; Telegraph

Source: Eight incredible sights to see on a Norwegian fjords cruise

Amsterdam to Norway on a Cruise Ship; Donnie Sexton; GoNOMAD Travel

Holland America cruise from Amsterdam to Norway. Virgin cruiser takes her first ocean cruise on the SS Koningsdam enjoying the food and the friendly staff.

Source: Amsterdam to Norway on a Cruise Ship – GoNOMAD Travel

Little-Known Cruise Ports to Visit; Ramsey Qubein; Reader’s Digest

Not all ships dock in major cities or popular Caribbean islands. Some of the most intriguing sights may be hidden behind an unfamiliar name.

Source: Little-Known Cruise Ports to Visit | Reader’s Digest

10 reasons you need to cruise in Norway; Lois Alter Mark; USA Today

During the summer, the sun never sets on the scenery of stunning Norway.

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Visiting Norway – The Best Fjords in Norway; Ben Steele; Just a Pack

Source: Visiting Norway – The Best Fjords in Norway – Just a Pack

Norwegian parliament adopts zero-emission regulations in World Heritage fjords; Unesco

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Norway – West Norwegian Fjords – Geirangerfjord and Nærøyfjord

The Norwegian Parliament has adopted a resolution to halt emissions from cruise ships and ferries in the West Norwegian Fjords – Geirangerfjord and Nærøyfjord World Heritage site by 2026 at the latest. This will make the fjords among the world’s first zero emission zones at sea. The decision is expected to have a positive impact on the local population, transport and tourism, climate and broader fjord environment, as well as the maritime industry.

The starkly dramatic landscapes of Geirangerfjord and Nærøyfjord, inscribed on the World Heritage List in 2005, are exceptional in scale and grandeur in a country of spectacular fjords. Situated in south-western Norway, the fjords are among the world’s longest and deepest, and vary in breadth from just 250 m to 2.5 km wide. Fjord, a word of Norwegian origin, refers to a long, deep inlet of the sea between high cliffs formed by submergence of a glaciated valley.

The property is a popular destination for cruise ships. In 2015, nearly 180 large cruise ships made a port of call at Geiranger, and 132 ships visited Flam (Nærøyfjord).

Read more from source: Norwegian parliament adopts zero-emission regulations in World Heritage fjords

London to Shetland Isles to Norway: Exploring the land of the midnight sun; Sarah Bryan Miller; St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Norway – West Norwegian Fjords – Geirangerfjord and Nærøyfjord

SHETLAND ISLES, Scotland — The ponies, shaggy and barrel-bellied, came up right to the car window. They seemed to be welcoming us but were probably expecting a treat. They were Shetland ponies, which made sense: We were in the Shetland Isles, on the largest island of the archipelago, the third destination on a Viking ocean cruise that took us from London to Norway, with plenty of midnight sun on the way.

Viking is best known for its river cruises; the company has added ocean cruises and does them very well, with new, comfortable and relatively small ships. They carry a maximum of 930 passengers and have witty lectures by academics in place of casinos.

Viking offers lots of excursions, but for Shetland, we hired a private guide. One of my ancestors emigrated from the Shetlands to Charleston, S.C., in the late 18th century.

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London to Shetland Isles to Norway: Exploring the land of the midnight sun; Sarah Bryan Miller; St Louis Post-Dispatch

Norway – West Norwegian Fjords – Geirangerfjord and Nærøyfjord

Shetland Isles, Scotland The ponies, shaggy and barrel-bellied, came up right to the car window. They seemed to be welcoming us but were probably expecting a treat. • They were Shetland ponies, which made sense: We were in the Shetland Isles, on the largest island of the archipelago, the third destination on a Viking ocean cruise that took us from London to Norway, with plenty of midnight sun on the way.

Viking is best known for its river cruises (hello, “Masterpiece” fans); the company has added ocean cruises and does them very well, with new, comfortable and relatively small ships. They carry a maximum of 930 passengers and have witty lectures by academics in place of casinos.

Viking offers lots of excursions, but for Shetland, we hired a private guide.

Read more

You’ll Be Able to Drive Through Sognefjorden, Norway’s Largest Fjord, by 2035; Ken Jennings; Condé Nast Traveler

Norway – West Norwegian Fjords – Geirangerfjord and Nærøyfjord

Sognefjord plunges over 4,300 feet deep, and was near impossible to cross—until now.

In this week’s Maphead, Ken Jennings explores Sognefjorden, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and Norway’s “King of Fjords.”

In western Norway, getting around is always going to be a problem: The coastline is inscribed with an endless series of towering cliffs and narrow fjords. Earlier this year, the Norwegian government announced a plan to dig a maritime tunnel through the Stadlandet peninsula, so ships could sail from fjord to fjord under dry land instead of having to go the long way around. But what about cars? Well, Norway has a first-of-its-kind shortcut in mind for those, too.

Meet the other king of Norway.

The Norwegian coast has over 1,190 fjords, and not all of them are narrow little inlets.

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