Day of the Dead meets the Tequila Train in this Mexican city; Mary Forgione; LA Times

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Double down on the spirits and the culture at Day of the Dead celebrations in Tequila

Source: Day of the Dead meets the Tequila Train in this Mexican city

5 Traditional Small Towns in Mexico You Must Visit; Nicole Leigh West; Wanderlust

Source: 5 Traditional Small Towns in Mexico You Must Visit

If not for women, there’d be no tequila; Sucheta Rawal; CNN

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Without the women of Tequila the town, there’d be no tequila the drink. International Women’s Day is a great time to find out the role they play in Mexico’s most famous liquor.

Source: If not for women, there’d be no tequila

All aboard Mexico’s tequila train; Alex Butler; Lonely Planet

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The round pyramids of Guadalajara Mexico; Ramon & Sharon Salcido; Record Gazette

Since archaeology and art are of interest to my wife and myself, we were thrilled to have the opportunity to visit the pyramids of Guachimontones (a UNESCO World Heritage site)…

Source: The round pyramids of Guadalajara Mexico

5 epic experiences for tequila enthusiasts on National Tequila Day; Eben Diskin; Matador Network

These are a few shots you should probably take.

Source: 5 epic experiences for tequila enthusiasts on National Tequila Day

Headaches and hangovers: On the trail through Tequila country; Kerry Van Der Jagt; Traveller

A train to tequila country reveals the history – and the deliciousness – of this spirited drink.

Source: Headaches and hangovers: On the trail through Tequila country

The Wild, Vibrant History of Mexican Tequila; Mark Seal; National Geographic

Mexico – Agave Landscape and Ancient Industrial Facilities of Tequila

When George Clooney and Rande Gerber’s tequila company, Casamigos, sold for $1 billion last year, it begged the question: How did the once-humble swill become so swank? A trek through Mexico distills all.

“ONCE UPON A TIME in Guadalajara, there lived two competing tequila-making families, Sauza and Cuervo,” read a March 1967 National Geographic story. “They had always quarreled and for a generation they had exchanged both insults and pistol shots. Sauza children never met Cuervo children in Guadalajara. But then young Javier Sauza went to a small university in Chicago…”

There, the third-generation heir to the Sauza tequila dynasty met and secretly married a beautiful, red-haired Cuervo relative.

Read more from source: The Wild, Vibrant History of Mexican Tequila

This Mexican Archaeological Site Has Been Underexplored for too Long; Lauren Cocking; Fodors

Mexico – Agave Landscape and Ancient Industrial Facilities of Tequila

It’s taken two rediscoveries of Guachimontones for visitors to realize how much these pyramids are worth the trek.

Situated right alongside the small Jalisco town of Teuchitlán, whose name derives from a Hispanic corruption of “place dedicated to divine forces,” (Teotzitlán in Nahuatl), Guachimontones is the wildly underrated Mexican ruin you (probably) never knew existed. However, its location just an hour outside the state capital of Guadalajara makes it an ideal day trip for those looking for something a little different.

Translated colloquially to “pyramid” or “structure” in English, the name Guachimontones is actually a fascinating coming together of both Nahuatl and Spanish language, as “guachi”(or “guaje”) refers to a type of tree, while the Spanish “montones” can contextually be translated to “a lot” or “many.”

In its heyday, Guachimontones was an important and influential site both commercially and ceremonially. Constructed roughly between 350 B.C.-350 A.D., it served as a major base for the civilization archaeologists have dubbed the “Teuchitlán Tradition” and had a population of around 40,000 people at its peak in around 200 A.D.

Read more from source: This Mexican Archaeological Site Has Been Underexplored for too Long