How ruins show us a darker side of architecture; Dan Barasch; CNN

Whether inspiring nostalgia, longing or a sense of loss, abandoned structures continue to fascinate.

Source: How ruins show us a darker side of architecture

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Korean wartime labor rulings spark debate; Philip Brasor; The Japan Times

The 2017 South Korean film, “The Battleship Island,” has yet to receive a theatrical release in Japan, even though it’s set on Hashima, more commonly known…

Source: Korean wartime labor rulings spark debate | The Japan Times

15 Incredible Places on Earth That Are Frozen in Time; Stephanie Pappas; Live Science

These are incredible places on Earth where time stands still.

Source: 15 Incredible Places on Earth That Are Frozen in Time

The Symbol of Rapid Industrialization – Gunkanjima Island in Nagasaki; Yoko; Taiken Japan

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Kyushu, a must-do destination for fans going to the 2019 Rugby World Cup; Rugby World

From hot springs and volcanoes to a unique food culture, Kyushu is a must-do destination for fans going to the 2019 Rugby World Cup…

Source: Kyushu, a must-do destination for fans going to the 2019 Rugby World Cup

8 abandoned cities around the world — and the eerie stories behind them; Chris Urie; This Is Insider

There’s something both intriguing and eerie about abandoned cities. They make you wonder what could have happened to make an entire city pick up and leave. Here are eight abandoned cities around the world and the stories behind them.

Source: 8 abandoned cities around the world — and the eerie stories behind them

Is Japan’s ‘Ghost Island’ (Gunkanjima) As Mysterious As It Looks? We Found Out; Jim Clash; Forbes

Gunkanjima, also known as Hashima or ‘Ghost’ Island, was once a thriving coal-mining operation with more than 5,200 inhabitants. When the coal ran out in 1974, the mysterious place was totally abandoned.

Source: Is Japan’s ‘Ghost Island’ (Gunkanjima) As Mysterious As It Looks? We Found Out

HASHIMA – BRUTAL HISTORY AND THE MOST HAUNTED ISLAND ON EARTH; Addison DePitt; Greanville Post

Source: HASHIMA – BRUTAL HISTORY AND THE MOST HAUNTED ISLAND ON EARTH

New High-Tech Air Conditioned Jackets Keep Gardeners Cool; Robin Plaskoff Horton; Urban Gardens Web

New High-Tech Cotton Air Conditioned Jackets With Battery-Pack and Fan Keep Japanese Gardeners Cool During Summer Heat.

Source: New High-Tech Air Conditioned Jackets Keep Gardeners Cool

Photographer with eye for the odd turns lens on Battleship Island; Toko Tanaka; The Asahi Shimbun

Japan – Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining

Photographer Kenji Sato is always on the lookout for a weird locale to capture in his lens, and is prepared to travel the world to find it.

For a change, he didn’t have to venture too far. Sato, 39, found what he was looking for in the abandoned coal-mining island of Hashima, nicknamed “Gunkanjima,” or Battleship Island, because its silhouette resembles a warship.

Sato’s new photo book, titled “The Island: Gunkanjima,” is his effort to preserve a sense of the decaying concrete buildings before they are lost forever.

“I don’t know whether the current sights can last another five or 10 years,” said the Tokyo-based photographer. “I wanted to preserve the sights now for the future.”

Sato has made a career out of photographing ruins–the weirder the better–around the world, and is well known for his book “Kikai Isan” (“The Wonderland’s Heritage”) dedicated to bizarre places, and other works.

Read more from source: Photographer with eye for the odd turns lens on Battleship Island:The Asahi Shimbun

Reasons to Add the Southernmost Island of Kyushu to Your Japan Vacation; Aren Bergstrom; Goway

Japan – Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining

Do yourself a favour and get off the main island when you’re on a Japan vacation. In particular, head to Kyushu, the nation’s southernmost major island.

There are four major islands in Japan, but most people don’t make it off the main island, Honshu. We get it. Honshu has Tokyo, Osaka, Kyoto, and Kobe, and that’s not even getting to any of the smaller centres like Takayama or Nikko that are charming beyond all measure. That being said, do yourself the favour and get off the main island when you’re on a Japan vacation. In particular, head to Kyushu, the nation’s southernmost major island.

Kyushu is largely defined by three things: volcanoes, historical sites, and food. Geographically, the island is covered in volcanoes, which makes it abound with natural hot springs. Historically, the island was a major trading port due to its proximity to China and the Korean Peninsula. European traders would connect to Japan through Nagasaki via Macao and Hong Kong, making Kyushu the point of contact for far-flung foreigners.

Source: Reasons to Add the Southernmost Island of Kyushu to Your Japan Vacation | Goway

The Most Unusual Islands On Earth; Awesome Inventions

Japan – Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining

There is something intriguing and almost mystical about islands. Perhaps this is due to the fact that they are often far away from our ‘real lives’. Set on their own, it takes exploration and purpose to visit these isolated places. Of course many of us live on islands or like to vacation on them. But the islands that we’re talking about are the ones which are still virtually unknown. Ones which have something special! Take a look at these 10 incredible islands and you’ll see just what we mean!

North Sentinel Island, India

The home of the ‘Sentineles’e tribe for 60,000 years, North Sentinel cannot be visited as anyone who sets foot there will be met by spears and arrows!

Tashirojima – Cat Island, Japan

One of Japan’s cat islands, Tashirojima boasts more feline than human inhabitants!

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The Ominous Skyline of a James Bond Villain’s Real-Life Lair; Michael Hardy; Wired

Japan – Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining

“Battleship Island,” as it’s known, has a tale almost dramatic as the plot of ‘Skyfall.’

IN THE 2012 James Bond film Skyfall, Daniel Craig’s 007 is lured—by a mysterious woman, naturally—to the island lair of the villainous Raoul Silva, a former MI6 agent gone rogue. Silva, the story goes, took over the island after hacking into the computers of the local chemical plant and simulating a leak, forcing the panicked inhabitants to flee overnight.

The real story of Hashima Island, which lies off the coast of Nagasaki in the East China Sea, is almost as dramatic. From the 1880s until 1974, when it was abruptly abandoned, the tiny island was a major Japanese coal mine, with tunnels stretching almost 2,000 feet under the earth.

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Japan to publicize testimony denying that Koreans were forced to work ‘under harsh conditions’ at UNESCO-listed ‘Battleship Island’; The Japan Times

Japan – Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining

Japan plans to make public some testimony denying that Koreans were forced to work under harsh conditions during World War II at what is now a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage site, government sources have said.

The controversial move could draw an angry rebuke from Seoul, which maintains that Korean workers were forced to toil in the Hashima Coal Mine off Nagasaki, on what is now known as Gunkanjima (“Battleship Island”), when the Korean Peninsula was under Japanese colonial rule between 1910 and 1945.

When the island was listed as a World Cultural Heritage site in 2015, Tokyo promised Seoul it would exhibit the history of Koreans forced to work there. Japan may continue to collect more testimony, potentially including acknowledgements of forced labor.

 

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S. Korea regrets Japan’s lack of respect for forced labor victims after UNESCO listing; Jung Min-Kyung; Korea Herald

Japan – Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining

South Korea expressed regret Tuesday over Japan’s disregard for its previous vow to honor the victims of colonial-era forced labor in its managing of UNESCO World Heritage-listed industrial facilities.

“The government expresses regret over the implementation report that Japan recently submitted as part of its follow-up measures on the world heritage listing of its modern industrial facilities,” Seoul’s Foreign Ministry said in a commentary issued in the name of its spokesman.

“The government urges Japan to take measures sincerely and swiftly as it promised the international community to remember the victims of its forced hard labor,” it added.

The commentary follows Tokyo’s decision to submit an 851-page report to UNESCO, which pushes for the installation of an information center for modern industrial facilities in Tokyo.

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Five reasons to visit Nagasaki: a 10 million dollar view, a James Bond island, castella and champon, and the Peace Park; Jamie Carter; South China Morning Post

Japan – Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining

Best known for being the site of the second and last nuclear weapon detonated as a weapon, Nagasaki is filled with Unesco sites, beautiful scenery, interesting islands and quirky dishes.

Nagasaki in Kyushu, southern Japan is famous for what happened during the second world war at 11.02 am on August 9, 1945, but while the accounts of how its citizens coped with the nuclear fallout are astonishing, this city of 1.4 million residents has a far bigger story to tell.

Its centre is full of busy izakayas and restaurants that hint at its long international outlook, with a lively Chinatown and many Chinese temples as well as the colonial Dutch Slope area, and even a reconstructed European trading port.

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The exotic holiday locations featured in Daniel Craig’s Bond films so far – and where he might be heading next; Jacob Lewis; The Sun

Japan – Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining

From Chilean deserts to abandoned islands off Japan – we reveal the dramatic destinations used in Daniel Craig’s Bond films as he confirms his return as agent 007.

WITH the chance to film in the world’s most glamorous locations, is it any wonder that Daniel Craig agreed to reprise his role as Bond for a fifth movie?

The 49-year-old actor confirmed yesterday that he’ll play the world’s most famous spy for a fifth and final time.

So to help you holiday like a secret agent, we’ve put together a list of the most exotic destinations from his movies so far – and our best guess as where he’s headed next.

Craig’s four Bond flicks have seen the film star jet set all over the globe, shooting explosive scenes in everywhere from Japan to Peru and Italy.

 

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Korea prods Japan to acknowledge forced labor on Hashima Island, other UNESCO-listed sites; Yonhap

Japan – Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining

South Korea has prodded Japan to acknowledge the country’s forced mobilization of Koreans at several UNESCO-listed world heritage sites in Japan, including Hashima Island, in the latest session of the United Nations body for culture and education, the foreign ministry said Thursday.

In the 41st session of UNESCO’s World Heritage Committee held in Krakow, Poland from July 2-12, South Korea’s Amb. to UNESCO Lee Byong-hyun issued a call on Japan to implement its pledge that the country made before UNESCO bestowed world heritage site status to some Japanese industrial sites two years ago.

Seven of the 23 Japanese modern industrial locations UNESCO chose as world heritage sites in July 2015 were involved in Japan’s mobilization of forced labor from Korea, then under Japan’s colonial control, and other Asian countries before and during World War II.

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Photographer captures stunning images of Battleship Island, an abandoned coal-mining settlement off the coast of Nagasaki; National Geographic

Japan – Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining

A photographer has shared a series of striking images that offer viewers an intriguing look at the ruins of Hashima Island, a former deep sea coal-mining settlement located approximately 20 kilometres off the coast of Nagasaki in Japan.

Nicknamed Gunkanjima, or “Battleship Island” in English due to its unique shape, the former thriving industrial commune was initially set up in the late 1800’s before being purchased by the Mitsubishi Corporation.

At one time the 16-acre island was home to over 5000 people, with labourers and their families living there permanently. The island was abandoned in 1974 when Japan was making the switch to petroleum energy. It also drew controversy during its time due to the fact that forced labourers worked on the site during WWII.

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Ghosts continue to haunt Japan’s Battleship Island; The Japan Times

Japan – Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining

The haunting silhouette of Hashima Island, known in English as Battleship Island, rises up from the sea, an abandoned testament to what was once the most densely populated city on Earth.

Thousands of men, women and children lived and worked on the island just off the coast of Nagasaki, working undersea coal mines that powered Japan’s rapid industrial rise from the late 19th century. But over the years, it made less and less economic sense and in 1974 operator Mitsubishi Mining abandoned the site.

Known in Japanese as Gunkanjima, it was the villain’s lair in the 2012 Bond film “Skyfall” and won UNESCO heritage status three years later, in 2015.

Not everyone, however, is happy about the attention being given to the sea-wall encircled island, a popular tourist destination whose silhouette is likened to a destroyer.

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