Qutub Minar’s 50-year-old doors, windows to be replaced by July end: ASI; PTI

Bat poop and bird droppings are spelling nightmare for the centuries-old Qutub Minar in Delhi, following which the ASI has started work on replacing its old wooden doors and windows, a senior…

Source: Qutub Minar’s 50-year-old doors, windows to be replaced by July end: ASI

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Most Amazing Historical Monuments of India; Vikas Acharya

India is a vast South Asian country with diverse terrain – from Himalayan peaks to Indian Ocean coastline – and history reaching back 5 millennia. In the north, Mughal Empire landmarks include Delh…

Source: Most Amazing Historical Monuments of India.

The 13 Most Famous Towers in the World; Luxatic

India – Qutb Minar and its Monuments, Delhi

Wherever we go, whatever place we visit, we seem to always be drawn to and impressed by prominent tall structures, in part because they’re tall but more because they’re special. Or used to be.

Towers in general didn’t have a housing purpose but more specialized ones, serving as clock towers, defensive structures or having observation and communication functions. Nowadays, since technology took on these roles, most of the towers serve as museums or offer leisure touristic activities.

The oldest of them date back to 8000 BC, as is the case of the Neolithic Jericho, and stretch all the way to present times, with the more modern ones taking more eccentric approaches in their design and architecture.

Let’s now take a look at The Most Famous Towers in the World:

13. Galata Tower

A special landmark of the Galata district in Istanbul, Turkey, dating from 1348, the Galata Tower was built as part of the fortifications that enclosed the Genoese colony.

With a height of 67 meters and its cone shape, the tower stands out allowing for a great view of the city and the region.

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Indian govt trying to privatise relics, allege activists; AFP

India – Qutb Minar and its Monuments, Delhi

Heritage activists on Sunday accused the Indian government of trying to privatise historic relics such as the Taj Mahal after it launched a controversial scheme allowing companies to “adopt” dozens of monuments.

Opposition politicians accused Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government of “leasing out” monuments under the “Adopt a Heritage” plan that will see 95 historic sites taken over by private entities.

India’s tourism ministry on Saturday announced a five-year contract worth 250 million rupees ($3.7 million) with the Dalmia Bharat conglomerate for the iconic 17th-century Red Fort in Delhi and another fort in the southern Andhra Pradesh state.

Other monuments on the list include the Taj Mahal — which two conglomerates are competing for — and the 12th-century Unesco-listed Qutub Minar complex in Delhi.

The Red Fort — built by Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in 1639 and also on the Unesco list — is where India’s prime minister makes an annual independence day speech.

The government says contracts awarded under the programme will only cover development, operations and maintenance of amenities around the Red Fort.

Dalmia Bharat will be allowed to put up some advertising, set ticket prices and earn money from their sales, under government supervision.

 

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Qutb and Mehrauli: The Past and Present of an Iconic Site; Swapne Liddle; The Wire

India – Qutb Minar and its Monuments, Delhi

In ‘Delhi’s Qutb Complex’, Catherine B. Asher goes beyond Mehrauli and Delhi to look at the afterlife of the iconic tower that is the Qutb Minar.

Mehrauli is truly a magical place. The average visitor skims but the surface, marvelling at the towering Qutb Minar and taking a cursory stroll through the other buildings that lie within the popular UNESCO World Heritage Site known as the Qutb complex. Those who go beyond, into the neighbouring village, may visit the shrine of the Sufi saint Qutbuddin Bakhtiyar Kaki, or a restaurant. There is now, of course, a smaller group of more adventurous explorers who are discovering the treasures of Mehrauli – particularly in the village and the Mehrauli Archaeological Park, mainly through the medium of increasingly popular ‘heritage walks’.

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FIFA U-17 World Cup: Know your venue — Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium, New Delhi; Hindustan Times

India – Qutb Minar and its Monuments, Delhi

Hosts India will be playing all their group matches of the FIFA Under-17 World Cup at the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium in New Delhi.

The Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium in New Delhi is not new to hosting mega events. This was the venue for 2010 Commonwealth Games opening ceremony. It has also seen its share of top flight football action – hosting the SAFF Championship and the Nehru Cup. Even Bundesliga giants Bayern Munich have set foot in this stadium turf for a testimonial for Bhaichung Bhutia.

However, the same pitch will not be used for the 2017 U-17 World Cup. The main field of play has been re-laid ahead of the youth tournament. Even the warm-up pitch saw major revamp after Jaime Yarza, FIFA head of tournaments, raised concerns.

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Go for a walk to Feroz Shah Kotla Fort and Qutub Minar on World Heritage Day; Hindustan Times

India – Qutb Minar and its Monuments, Delhi

Feroz Shah Kotla Fort and the Qutub Minar complex are two landmarks in Delhi that deserve long, leisurely exploration.For those interested in the socio-political history of the Delhi Sultanate period (13th to mid-16th century), the Qutub Minar walk is a must.The perfect occasion for doing that is World Heritage Day, on April 18.These two huge heritage complexes, with their magnificent ruins, are being covered by Sahapedia, a non-profit organisation that has lined up a week-long celebration with heritage walks, nature walks, and calligraphy workshops.Aamir Ahmed, who will conduct the walk, says, “There are multiple opinions on why Qutub Minar was built.

Feroz Shah Kotla Fort and the Qutub Minar complex are two landmarks in Delhi that deserve long, leisurely exploration. The perfect occasion for doing that is World Heritage Day, on April 18.

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