Westminster Bullying Can Finally Be Stamped Out For Good; John Benger; Huffington Post

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Why Big Ben is still covered in scaffolding; April Curtin; My London

What’s the update on the world’s most iconic clock?

Source: Why Big Ben is still covered in scaffolding

Rasen and Caistor MP praises Palace renovation rethink; Market Rasen Mail

Sir Edward Leigh MP has welcomed the news that the current plans for the restoration of the Palace of Westminster are to be reviewed. Planning applications currently being considered would involve the demolition of a Grade II*-listed building on the parliamentary estate that is in perfectly usable working condition – plans which have been condemned by architects, preservationists, and environmental consultants.

Source: Rasen and Caistor MP praises Palace renovation rethink

10 Facts About Westminster Abbey; Kat Long; Mental Floss

From its humble beginnings as an island monastery, Westminster Abbey has grown into the cultural and spiritual heart of London, as well as the final resting place of kings, queens, and poets.

Source: 10 Facts About Westminster Abbey

Inside Parliament: Ever Fancied Being A Commons Tour Guide? Now’s Your Chance; Kate Forrester; Huffington Post

UK – Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abbey including Saint Margaret’s Church

Vast and sprawling, with dozens of hidden chambers and corners, the Houses of Parliament are tricky to navigate even for veteran pass holders.

But there’s one dedicated team who, between them, have everything covered – and they are hiring new members.

The visitors services team are responsible for showing everyone who comes to Parliament around the UNESCO World Heritage site – from A-list celebrities to school trips.

HuffPost UK caught up with Amy Treble, one of their operations managers, whose career in the Commons began as a tour guide, as her department prepares to recruit 28 new visitor engagement assistants.

“When you start out in the job, it can be a little bit daunting because you have to figure out where all the different rooms are, all the different routes, where the step-free access is [for disabled visitors],” she said.

“I remember being so totally overwhelmed when I first started, and then someone asked me to go and do an escort by myself.  I thought I couldn’t do it, but then you do it and it’s great and you realise that you can.

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The 10 Best Westminster Abbey Tours, Trips & Tickets – London; Viator

UK – Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abbey including Saint Margaret’s Church
A UNESCO World Heritage site, with a legacy dating back more than 1,000 years, Westminster Abbey is among London’s most historic landmarks. The Gothic church is best known for hosting headline-grabbing events involving the British royal family, such as the Queen’s coronation, Princess Diana’s funeral, and Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding.
The Basics
A tour of Westminster Abbey is like taking a walk through British history. Explore independently with an audio guide, on a tour led by a verger (church official), or with a private guide. Tickets include access to all the main areas of the church. The London Pass also grants access to Westminster Abbey.
 
Things to Know Before You Go
  • Booking in advance will help you avoid waiting in long lines.

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Big Ben facts – how tall is the Elizabeth Tower, when was it built and how does it keep time? Everything you need to know; Maryse Godden; The Sun

UK – Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abbey including Saint Margaret’s Church

Elizabeth Tower – home to the bells and the most photographed building in Britain – is undergoing restoration work.

BIG Ben’s famous bongs have marked the hour in London with almost unbroken service for the past 157 years.

The Elizabeth Tower – home to the bells – will be silenced for four years from August 21 as £29million restoration work is carried out – here’s some facts about Britain’s most famous clock.

Who named Big Ben?

It is thought that the bell was originally to be called Royal Victoria in honour of Queen Victoria but Londoners started calling the bell “Big Ben” and the name stuck.

The origin of the nickname remains the subject of some debate.

It is believed Big Ben was named after Sir Benjamin Hall, who oversaw the installation of the Great Bell.

 

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24 astonishing facts about Big Ben’s history as it’s revealed the bongs are gone for a long time; Ben Glaze; Mirror Online

UK – Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abbey including Saint Margaret’s Church

Big Ben bonged for the last time on Monday before falling silent for the longest period in its 158-year history – and what a history.

Big Ben bongs for the last time on Monday before falling silent for four years – the longest period in its 158-year history.

The Elizabeth Tower, home to the Great Clock and the world’s most famous bell, is undergoing a £29million restoration.

The bell will be paused until 2021 to keep workers safe. But it will still ring out on New Year’s Eve and Remembrance Sunday. Steve Jaggs, keeper of the Great Clock, said: “Big Ben falling silent is a significant milestone in this crucial conservation project.

“The public are welcome to mark this important moment by gathering in Parliament Square to hear Big Ben’s final bongs until they return in 2021.”

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The Most Visited Historic Sites In England; WorldAtlas.com

UK – Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abbey including Saint Margaret’s Church

England’s rich and long history is well-presented and well-preserved in these historic sites in the country.

10. Leeds Castle

Leeds Castle, located in the city of Kent, is the 10th most visited historic site in England. The castle, as it is known today, was built in 1119 AD on islands in a lake formed by Len River. The site where the castle sits, however, has been important since as early as 857 AD, when it held a wooden structure owned by Leed, a Saxon chief. In 1976, the castle was opened to the public and in 2009, it received 646,801 visitors. Leeds Castle was once home to an aviary from 1980 to 2012, however, the foundation closed it for budgetary purposes. Today, tourists can make their way through the on-site grotto and maze, play a round of golf, and visit the dog collar museum.

 

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Tracing Britain’s History Through its Cathedrals; Ruth Kozak; Oye Times

You don’t have to be a religious person to appreciate the majesty of Britain’s many cathedrals. All of them are significant in British history and each contains historical relics such as the tombs of kings and statesmen.

Source: Tracing Britain’s History Through its Cathedrals