Tag: ES – Cultural Landscape of the Serra de Tramuntana

In Mallorca, peace, pleasantries – and paella; Bob Drogin; Washington Post

Photo: Frankie Drogin

There are destination restaurants, out-of-the-way and often overpriced fine-dining joints run by celebrity chefs who attract limos full of foodies and their followers. Then there is Sa Foradada. It supposedly had some of the best paella in Mallorca, Spain’s largest island.

Source: In Mallorca, peace, pleasantries – and paella

The natural world of Majorca; Andrew Ede; Majorca Daily Bulletin

Photo: Xesca Serra

Learn about the beauties surrounding the island. Discover Majorca’s natural treasures and its Mediterranean diet.

Source: The natural world of Majorca

Enjoy Mallorca: Ten years of the Tramuntana World Heritage Site; Andrew Ede; Majorca Daily Bulletin

Photo: Majorca Daily Bulletin

The keys to the Unesco declaration were culture and landscape. Has the Unesco declaration made any real difference?

Source: Enjoy Mallorca: Ten years of the Tramuntana World Heritage Site

36 Hours in Majorca; Ingrid K Williams; NY Times

Read more from source

Love Island: 6 reasons to embrace your inner Islander and visit Mallorca; Virgin Media Television

No offence to the new-look villa, but there’s more to Mallorca than named water bottles and Anton’s wandering eye.

Source: Love Island: 6 reasons to embrace your inner Islander and visit Mallorca – Lifestyle from Xposé – Virgin Media Television

Foodie roadtrip in Mallorca; Lucy Gillmore; Olive Magazine

Savour two different sides of this Spanish island’s food scene: head into the mountains for suckling pig with spicy red wines, then down into bustling Palma for kimchi butter and squid ink macarons…

Source: Foodie roadtrip in Mallorca

Explore the Mallorcan mountains on horseback; Ana Hernandez; See Mallorca

3-day horse riding trek in the Serra de Tramuntana in October…

Source: Explore the Mallorcan mountains on horseback

Limestone homecoming and olive trees; Annie O’G Worsley; Red River Croft

Spain – Cultural Landscape of the Serra de Tramuntana

For a few years I took groups of university students to Mallorca. It was both a privilege and a pleasure; hard work but great fun. Through fieldwork we investigated the island’s mountain and coastal landscapes and tried to piece together the natural and anthropogenic factors that contribute to their very particular character. Now with UNESCO World Heritage status, the high mountains and rugged coasts of the Serra de Tramuntana are remarkable and beautifully wild, yet they have a long history of human occupation. The limestone geology has exerted considerable structural control on landforms, soils and vegetation resulting in a unique landscape of serrated mountains and deep gorges. Over thousands of years people built stone terraces, complex water management systems, villages and steep footpaths; they managed woodlands and created groves of olive, citrus, almond and carob.

Read more

%d bloggers like this: