Category Archives: Botswana

Okavango: River of Dreams – A mesmerising ecological experience and near-perfect lockdown viewing; Jacob Dykes; Geographical Magazine

Okavango: River of Dreams is a mesmerising portrayal of Africa’s wildlife. Near-perfect lockdown viewing.

Source: Okavango: River of Dreams – A mesmerising ecological experience and near-perfect lockdown viewing – Geographical Magazine

What is Tsodilo Rock Art?; Monica Herald; World Atlas

Tsodilo rock art is one of the most prominent tourist attractions in Botswana.

Source: What is Tsodilo Rock Art?

Why the Okavango Delta in Botswana is a World Heritage Site; Africa Geographic

This World Heritage Day, we celebrate one of the most untouched and ecologically diverse places in Africa – Botswana’s Okavango Delta.

Source: Why the Okavango Delta in Botswana is a World Heritage Site – Africa Geographic

Explore this lush safari spot with our expert’s insider tips; Andrew Stein; National Geographic

Explore the thriving safari industry with these insider tips.

Source: Explore this lush safari spot with our expert’s insider tips

What is the Best Time to Visit Okavango Delta and Other Top Tips; Stephanie Parker; Big World Small Pockets

If you’re thinking of hitting up this watery, wildlife wonderworld , here’s the best time to visit Okavango Delta and Stephanie Parker’s other top tips.

Source: What is the Best Time to Visit Okavango Delta and Other Top Tips – Big World Small Pockets

What It’s Really Like Experiencing Botswana’s Okavango Delta; Carla Powell; Intrepid Travel

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Africa’s great tourism success story; Nina Karnikowski; Traveller

This middle-income African nation of two million is rightly referred to as the king of safari.

Source: Africa’s great tourism success story

How to survive an encounter with Africa’s most deadly creature; Keith Austin; Traveller

Botswana – Okavango Delta

It’s amazing how quickly one’s fear and bloodlust can be assuaged with a glass of bubbly and a peanut.

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25 Photos that’ll make you want to visit Botswana and the Okavango Delta; Abi King; Inside The Travel Lab

Botswana – Okavango Delta

An in-depth account of an Okavango Delta Safari Botswana that makes you feel as though you are right there already. Plus how to book.

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Unmissable adventures around the world; Lonely Planet

Botswana – Tsodilo

Hike, climb, cycle, surf, canoe… there are countless ways to explore a country if you’ve got a taste for adventure. But which of these pulse-quickening experiences fall into the ‘don’t-leave-without’ category?

In this excerpt from Lonely Planet’s Atlas of Adventures, we look at some of the action-packed activities that define a destination, from kayaking through sea caves in Vietnam to paragliding over beaches in Turkey.

1. Don’t leave the USA without…

Hiking Zion National Park’s Angels Landing Trail – just 8km long, but utterly unforgettable. The last 100m traverses a ledgy via ferrata route to a pedestal smack in the middle of the canyon, 460m above the canyon floor and the Virgin River below. Not for the faint of heart or the acrophobic.

2. Don’t leave Australia without…

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Explorers Enter Heart of Africa With Fat Bikes and Scuba Gear; Brian Clark Howard; National Geographic

Botswana – Okavango Delta

A new phase of exploration targets the wilderness of the Okavango region.

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Tsodilo Rock Art, Botswana; World Atlas

5. Description and History

The Tsodilo Rock Art is located in the Tsodilo Hills in the Ngamiland District in the country of Botswana in Africa. The Tsodilo Hills is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Tsodilo Hills area consists of four chief hills, of which three are known as the Male Hill, Female Hill, Child and Hill. The other hill does not have a name. The Tsodilo Hills is made up of rock shelters, caves and depressions, but what makes it a World Heritage Sites and an important locations is the ancient rock art located in the area. The ancient rock art paintings in the area are mostly in the caves, although some are out in the open air. The paintings are either done in white or red, the white paintings are attributed to the Bantu people, while the red paintings are attributed to the San people.

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