Saudi eases access to long-hidden ruins; Assaad Abboud; IOL Travel

Saudi Arabia – Al-Hijr Archaeological Site (Madâin Sâlih)

Fully draped in a black veil, Irish blonde Angela Miskelly stares out in awe as she strolls through Al-Hijr, the ancient Saudi city of tombs carved into rose-coloured sandstone mountains.

“Spectacular… wonderful… breathtaking,” she says. “But where are the tourists? If we had a site like this in my country, we would have millions of tourists!”

Dating back to the second century BC, the Nabataean archaeological site, also known as Madain Saleh, has long been hidden from foreign visitors in this ultra-conservative kingdom that rarely opens up to tourists.

Saudi Arabia is thought to have been wary of archaeologists and scientists seeking to study its ancient ruins for fear their findings could shine the spotlight on pre-Islamic civilisations that once thrived there.

In recent years, however, Saudis have increasingly ventured to these sites and the authorities are more tolerant of their curiosity.

Described as the largest and best preserved site of the Nabataean civilisation south of Petra in Jordan, Madain Saleh is the first Saudi archaeological site to be inscribed on Unesco’s World Heritage List.

 

 

Read more from source: Saudi eases access to long-hidden ruins | IOL Travel

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